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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2007 :  12:30:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you haven't seen them yet, check out these issues of Flashback-Newsletter of the Hammond Historical Society at http://www.hammondindiana.com/society_page.html . To access the issues you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader. The November 2003 issue has an article about the production of "A Christmas Story," and the November 2002 issue has a feature story about the Orpheum Theatre in downtown Hammond including a photo.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2007 :  19:41:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, my feet are still glowing !! For those who have never been zapped by the 10-15 RADS of x-rays for each exposure, here it is:





In 1946, the American Standards Association established a “safe standard or tolerance dose,” that the feet receive no more than 2 R per 5 second exposure. Children were not to receive more than 12 such exposures in a single year.
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2007 :  23:03:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

If you haven't seen them yet, check out these issues of Flashback-Newsletter of the Hammond Historical Society at http://www.hammondindiana.com/society_page.html . To access the issues you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader. The November 2003 issue has an article about the production of "A Christmas Story," and the November 2002 issue has a feature story about the Orpheum Theatre in downtown Hammond including a photo.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2007 :  23:12:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken: First of all, sorry for duplicating your message - I was trying to reply.
More importantly, thank you SO much for listing that link to the historical newsletters about Hammond. So much info and so many great memories - The Parthenon, Wolf Lake, the South Shore Line, Goldblatt's clock, and on and on. All bringing back memories of my childhood. I was from EC, but with my mom as a youngster, we would ride the bus to shop the REAL downtown. And then later, as a teenager many of us would go to the movies as a group or on dates. My then girlfriend lived just south of downtown off of Hohman Ave on some circle side street that went to the west not far from the Cadillac dealership.
I will spend more time reading through those great articles. Thanks again.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2007 :  11:13:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Duane,
How does Glendale Blvd. sound for where your girlfriend lived? I think that was the circle across Hohman near where Knoerzer Cadillac was located.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2007 :  11:21:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim

Yes, my feet are still glowing !! For those who have never been zapped by the 10-15 RADS of x-rays for each exposure, here it is:





In 1946, the American Standards Association established a “safe standard or tolerance dose,” that the feet receive no more than 2 R per 5 second exposure. Children were not to receive more than 12 such exposures in a single year.


5 gold stars for you, Jim! I had a pretty faded memory of what those things had looked like. Now I'm back up to speed. They look like they could double as a Flash Gordon bombsight....CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/04/2007 12:25:58
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2007 :  16:50:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, I was fascinated seeing my toes wiggle in the shoes. The maximum dose was supposed to be NMT 2 Rads/5 sec exposure. Most fittings took about 30-35 seconds per pair of shoes tried. If the 1st pair wasn't right, you simply tried a second for another 14 Rads. Let's see that's 28 total so far. No, I think the first pair fit better, let's look at those again (Total = 42 Rads). And, then Jim says, "Can I see it again?" (Total = 56 Rads) Thankfully, other vital organs received a little less. I was really excited when my feet were growing fast and I could do it again in 6 months.

Check out 2 good sites for additional information:

Shoe-Fitting Fluoroscope
http://www.orau.org/ptp/collection/shoefittingfluor/shoe.htm

and,

"Were those old shoe store fluoroscopes a health hazard?"
http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a2_414a.html

Edited by - Jim on 04/04/2007 16:51:56
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2007 :  22:06:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken - Yep. Glendale blvd - that's the place. I never would have remembered, but once you said it, the link is reformed in my aging memory.
Thanks again for the great newsletters. I'm going back to do more reading and reminiscing. -D
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2007 :  22:39:40  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
WOW What a find. Thanks for locating the information. Oh our naïveté.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2007 :  10:10:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Duane -- Don't give me credit for a great memory achievement. Google maps provided the answer since Glendale is the only circle drive in that part of Hammond.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 04/05/2007 10:12:05
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2007 :  11:53:55  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
The WOW was for finding the shoe machine. It is an interesting object for those not alive at the time. It looks like a contraption of the 1800's

Linda
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2007 :  14:27:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

Duane -- Don't give me credit for a great memory achievement. Google maps provided the answer since Glendale is the only circle drive in that part of Hammond.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960


Don't beat up on yourselves for the memory loss, guys. It was those X-ray machines that have robbed us of our memory. Another Godless communist plot!!..........CJ
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2007 :  18:02:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Linda,

If we're talking about the same doctor, it was Ramker. They lived on the east side of Arizona Ave. - right across the street from the OLPH convent - where I attended grade school with his son Richard (we graduated in 1963).

An interesting aside: In Sept. 1963 I was out one late afternoon riding my brand new 3-speed bike. I came around the back of OLPH, down the ramp next to the boiler room and in to the school's parking lot where I was immeiately head-on'd by a car. Knocked me out cold; also broke a collar bone. I was told later that while I was unconscious Dr. Ramker was contacted. He hurried across the street and, among other things, re-set my collar bone. All I can say is thank God I was out when he did it. :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond

---------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by svea3

Johnson? or Harmon? We were related toTom Harmon who went to UM and his son Mark.MyUncle,Walter Harmon, was Treasurer in E Chicago in 1905. The Johnson's came in from Iowa. My grandmother Cecilia Harmon was a surgeon/medic in the Civil War. That side was direct from Sweden. I think our Swedish surname would have been Johansson, according to my Grandfather.

Dr Rampker.... My dad interviewed him to bring him to Hessville. He was a Korean War vet.You entered his office from the left. He gave me many a shot at my house. He was always concerned about me getting Scarlet Fever.



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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2007 :  18:06:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom,

I've got a good one for you. In the 1960s (and perhaps '70s) there was another record store across the street from Millikan's. I used to buy records there around 1964-65. Do you remember it? I can't recall the name.

Also, does anyone remember Gregory's, the grocery store on the northwest corner of Kennedy and 173rd? :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond

---------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

quote:
Originally posted by eyebab

In the 50's I remember 2 stores on the west side of Kennedy, down by Morton, called "The Emporium" and "Whitakers." Whitakers was a small grocery run by two old maid sisters while the Emporium was a small variety shop where I remember buying 33 stamps for 99 cents. Also remember a hardware store right off the SW corner of Kennedy and 169th. Down from there was a plumbing Co.where the Dedelow(oldest son became mayor of Hammond)family lived upstairs.

Used to take a bus to downtown Hammond and get off at Woolworths and head over to Goldblatts and go down in the basement and get two steamed hot dogs(buns steamed too) and a coke...all for a quarter. Upstairs on the 2nd floor they had a shoe repair where you would sit in an open booth in your stocking feet while your shoes were resoled.

Also on State Street there was a place which sold 78 rpm records and they had booths with phonographs where you could listen to the latest record before buying(or more likely for me,just listen to your favorite record without buying.)

One subject I haven't seen broached is teachers. At Morton High Albert Clark was the principle. 9th hour dicipinarian was named Ruff and he taught Latin. Miss Virden taught English. Mr. Flansburg taught algebra. Maury Zlotnik was the football coach. Other names: Chidester, Hand, Groves, Melton.

Hammond and esp. Hessville in the late 40's and 50's was a perfect place for growing up. I know change always comes and you can't live in the past, but I sure cherish those childhood memories.

jerry



Jerry:

My era was more the decades of the 50's and 60's, since I was born in 1949, but I agree that they were wonderful times and that Hammond was a fantastic place to grow up back then.

I was not from the Hessville section of Hammond, but I was not far from that area. I grew up on Woodward Avenue, which is only one block long and runs parallel to Calumet Avenue and two blocks east of it, from 165th Street on the southern end to Cleveland Street on the northern end.

The store on State Street that let you listen to records was Milliken's and was across the street from Minas's.

We sure had one great little downtown, didn't we? I've got an essay in here somewhere about Downtown Hammond that you might enjoy reading.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2007 :  18:36:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chris,

Hello. Just out of curiosity I'd interested in where you obtained the ID for Violette Lipke.

The reason I ask is - well, here's the story. I spent 3rd through 8th grade at OLPH school in Hessville. In 8th grade (1962-63) a new student was one of my classmates. His name was Ed Lipke. His family had just moved to Hessville from East Chicago. Ed and I became best buddies, a friendship that spanned several years. I'm assuming that Violette was a family relation. :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond


quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

quote:
Originally posted by svea3

Pix #2 girl on right is familiar,but no name yet.

I live now close to a town called Wyandotte,MI,which started at the same vintage of Hessville, Hammond. Not only that, but there is a section which has a refinery just like Whiting. We produce Marathon.


The girl on the rightwas ID'd as Violette Lipke from somewhere in Hessville.....CJ

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hhs59

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2007 :  09:23:29  Show Profile  Visit hhs59's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Good morning everyone...
We have a growing website at www.hhs59.com that you may enjoy visiting. Be sure you have a lot of time because there is a lot of information about growing up in Hammond, Indiana during the 50's and the fun we had. Even the recipe for Maid-Rite Hamburgers is buried on the LUNCH page, places we used to eat as kids.
I am adding 1932 copies of The Calumet Herald in a new web page on "Historical Documents". You may view and/or download them in .pdf format. Very clear and in good detail.
Let me know if you, or anyone, has information to add; pictures, class photos, links, etc. and I will be glad to post them.
We are avid fans of Jean Shepherd and have some good photos of his Harding School...
Enjoy!
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2007 :  11:33:29  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
TO:Mike Rapchak Jr.
Gregory's Super Market was one of my dad's rentals. I lived ontop of the store and it was my dog LISA, white German Shepherd, who was impounded all the time, because of jumping and snipping the boys who would throw rocks at her. LISA was the daughter of Topper and Boots , the store's guard dogs. We used to feed LISA 5lbs of horsemeat a day. Spiro used to run a small vegetable/flower market in more downtown Hammond, before that. Any other questions?.

My family comes from Hessville in the 1840's. Gavin and Caldwell were friends of my dad. My great grandfather gave the property for the Caldwell School.
I was also friends with George Hammond's great grand daughter. She and I taught together.

Linda OPMHS '60
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2007 :  12:02:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[quote]Originally posted by Pro2am

Chris,

Hello. Just out of curiosity I'd interested in where you obtained the ID for Violette Lipke.

The reason I ask is - well, here's the story. I spent 3rd through 8th grade at OLPH school in Hessville. In 8th grade (1962-63) a new student was one of my classmates. His name was Ed Lipke. His family had just moved to Hessville from East Chicago. Ed and I became best buddies, a friendship that spanned several years. I'm assuming that Violette was a family relation. :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond


Hi Mike,
Believe it or not, you and I shared a class at OLPH as well. I can't remember which one, but I started at St. Catherine of Sienna when it opened I think with the 5th, maybe 6th grade. It could have been the 4th grade maybe with a Miss Brinzo? I'm not sure if she's the one.
Ed Lipke would be a nephew of Violette Lipke. Ed still lives in Hessville. In fact he was part of my graduating class from Morton in 67......CJ
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2007 :  18:40:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

[quote]Originally posted by Pro2am

Chris,

Hello. Just out of curiosity I'd interested in where you obtained the ID for Violette Lipke.

The reason I ask is - well, here's the story. I spent 3rd through 8th grade at OLPH school in Hessville. In 8th grade (1962-63) a new student was one of my classmates. His name was Ed Lipke. His family had just moved to Hessville from East Chicago. Ed and I became best buddies, a friendship that spanned several years. I'm assuming that Violette was a family relation. :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond


Hi Mike,
Believe it or not, you and I shared a class at OLPH as well. I can't remember which one, but I started at St. Catherine of Sienna when it opened I think with the 5th, maybe 6th grade. I could have been with you in the 4th grade maybe with a Miss Brinzo? I'm not sure if she's the one.
Ed Lipke would be a nephew of Violette Lipke. Ed still lives in Hessville. In fact he was part of my graduating class from Morton in 67......CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/07/2007 11:23:48
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  11:35:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey guys -- I didn't attend OLPH, but do have a couple memories of the place in the late 1950s. There was the fund raising carnival in the parking lot behind the school every summer that everyone attended. And something that we definitely wouldn't see in the public schools these days -- We had a short club period at Morton each week, I believe for 35 minutes or so on Tuesday mornings. During that time, the Catholic students were permitted to go over to OLPH for some form of religious training. Did that carry over to the 60s?

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  19:49:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK antique experts! Help settle an argument. In this 1950 picture of "The Sugar Bowl" in Hessville, is that thing in back, to the left of the blond, a door or an old wooden phone booth?.......CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/07/2007 19:49:37
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  20:53:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Linda,

Many thanks for the wonderful information. I'm trying to remember all the dogs! :) I do recall applying for a job there (stock boy?) in the mid-1960s. For some reason it never manifested.

Also very interestng about the Caldwell School property. Although no one in my family ever went there, it was always a staple in our daily lives when we lived in Hessville. My best friend Ed Lipke (see the Violette Lipke thread) lived just south of the shcool - at 7340 Delaware Ave. Also, my oldest son played a lot of little league baseball there during the 1980s.

Mike Rapchak Jr.

-----------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by svea3

TO:Mike Rapchak Jr.
Gregory's Super Market was one of my dad's rentals. I lived ontop of the store and it was my dog LISA, white German Shepherd, who was impounded all the time, because of jumping and snipping the boys who would throw rocks at her. LISA was the daughter of Topper and Boots , the store's guard dogs. We used to feed LISA 5lbs of horsemeat a day. Spiro used to run a small vegetable/flower market in more downtown Hammond, before that. Any other questions?.

My family comes from Hessville in the 1840's. Gavin and Caldwell were friends of my dad. My great grandfather gave the property for the Caldwell School.
I was also friends with George Hammond's great grand daughter. She and I taught together.

Linda OPMHS '60

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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  20:58:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken,

I'm not sure about the religious-training part, but I know that the carnivals (called OLPH "Festivals") continued well into the 1960s. They were held at the end of August, just before the new school year began. I think the last one I attended was in 1963, right before I started high school. :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.

---------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

Hey guys -- I didn't attend OLPH, but do have a couple memories of the place in the late 1950s. There was the fund raising carnival in the parking lot behind the school every summer that everyone attended. And something that we definitely wouldn't see in the public schools these days -- We had a short club period at Morton each week, I believe for 35 minutes or so on Tuesday mornings. During that time, the Catholic students were permitted to go over to OLPH for some form of religious training. Did that carry over to the 60s?

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  21:06:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chris,

Do you know Ed? What a small world. I haven't been in touch with him for a few years. AFAIK he was living on Cleveland St.; don't know if he's still at that adress.

And you went to OLPH, too? Wow. Yes, I remember Miss/Mrs. Brinzo! She was my 3rd grade teacher - my fist year at OLPH (1957-58). Were we in the same classes together? Do you remember a kid named Terry Parris? How many years were you at OLPH? Did you graduate from there? Did you by any chance go to Bishop Noll? Sorry for the 3rd degree, and I may be mistaken, but man, your name sure sounds familiar. :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.

------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

[quote]Originally posted by Pro2am

Chris,

Hello. Just out of curiosity I'd interested in where you obtained the ID for Violette Lipke.

The reason I ask is - well, here's the story. I spent 3rd through 8th grade at OLPH school in Hessville. In 8th grade (1962-63) a new student was one of my classmates. His name was Ed Lipke. His family had just moved to Hessville from East Chicago. Ed and I became best buddies, a friendship that spanned several years. I'm assuming that Violette was a family relation. :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond


Hi Mike,
Believe it or not, you and I shared a class at OLPH as well. I can't remember which one, but I started at St. Catherine of Sienna when it opened I think with the 5th, maybe 6th grade. It could have been the 4th grade maybe with a Miss Brinzo? I'm not sure if she's the one.
Ed Lipke would be a nephew of Violette Lipke. Ed still lives in Hessville. In fact he was part of my graduating class from Morton in 67......CJ

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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  21:11:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey CJ... I'm not an antique expert, but that sure looks like the back door to me. As far as I can remember, the phone booths from that era all had the glass bi-fold doors.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  21:36:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chris,

As far as I can tell it's a door. I don't know if it's a back door or one to a side room (and it's open in this photo). :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
--------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

OK antique experts! Help settle an argument. In this 1950 picture of "The Sugar Bowl" in Hessville, is that thing in back, to the left of the blond, a door or an old wooden phone booth?.......CJ


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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2007 :  22:11:55  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike:

Where was Comay's Jewelers? I think they were on Hohman, so that wouldn't be the place you are talking about. Comay's let people listen to records, I believe. Comay's had a store in Woodmar Shopping Center, I think, in addition to the downtown store.

Tom

quote:
Originally posted by Pro2am

Tom,

I've got a good one for you. In the 1960s (and perhaps '70s) there was another record store across the street from Millikan's. I used to buy records there around 1964-65. Do you remember it? I can't recall the name.

Also, does anyone remember Gregory's, the grocery store on the northwest corner of Kennedy and 173rd? :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond

---------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

quote:
Originally posted by eyebab

In the 50's I remember 2 stores on the west side of Kennedy, down by Morton, called "The Emporium" and "Whitakers." Whitakers was a small grocery run by two old maid sisters while the Emporium was a small variety shop where I remember buying 33 stamps for 99 cents. Also remember a hardware store right off the SW corner of Kennedy and 169th. Down from there was a plumbing Co.where the Dedelow(oldest son became mayor of Hammond)family lived upstairs.

Used to take a bus to downtown Hammond and get off at Woolworths and head over to Goldblatts and go down in the basement and get two steamed hot dogs(buns steamed too) and a coke...all for a quarter. Upstairs on the 2nd floor they had a shoe repair where you would sit in an open booth in your stocking feet while your shoes were resoled.

Also on State Street there was a place which sold 78 rpm records and they had booths with phonographs where you could listen to the latest record before buying(or more likely for me,just listen to your favorite record without buying.)

One subject I haven't seen broached is teachers. At Morton High Albert Clark was the principle. 9th hour dicipinarian was named Ruff and he taught Latin. Miss Virden taught English. Mr. Flansburg taught algebra. Maury Zlotnik was the football coach. Other names: Chidester, Hand, Groves, Melton.

Hammond and esp. Hessville in the late 40's and 50's was a perfect place for growing up. I know change always comes and you can't live in the past, but I sure cherish those childhood memories.

jerry



Jerry:

My era was more the decades of the 50's and 60's, since I was born in 1949, but I agree that they were wonderful times and that Hammond was a fantastic place to grow up back then.

I was not from the Hessville section of Hammond, but I was not far from that area. I grew up on Woodward Avenue, which is only one block long and runs parallel to Calumet Avenue and two blocks east of it, from 165th Street on the southern end to Cleveland Street on the northern end.

The store on State Street that let you listen to records was Milliken's and was across the street from Minas's.

We sure had one great little downtown, didn't we? I've got an essay in here somewhere about Downtown Hammond that you might enjoy reading.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!






A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2007 :  17:21:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom,

I don't think the store I'm taling about was Comay's. It seems that it was a rather obscure little place, the name of which I can't recall. But I could be mistaken (i.e., it may have been a name that would be instantly recognizable). :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.

--------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

Mike:

Where was Comay's Jewelers? I think they were on Hohman, so that wouldn't be the place you are talking about. Comay's let people listen to records, I believe. Comay's had a store in Woodmar Shopping Center, I think, in addition to the downtown store.

Tom

quote:
Originally posted by Pro2am

Tom,

I've got a good one for you. In the 1960s (and perhaps '70s) there was another record store across the street from Millikan's. I used to buy records there around 1964-65. Do you remember it? I can't recall the name.

Also, does anyone remember Gregory's, the grocery store on the northwest corner of Kennedy and 173rd? :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond

---------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

quote:
Originally posted by eyebab

In the 50's I remember 2 stores on the west side of Kennedy, down by Morton, called "The Emporium" and "Whitakers." Whitakers was a small grocery run by two old maid sisters while the Emporium was a small variety shop where I remember buying 33 stamps for 99 cents. Also remember a hardware store right off the SW corner of Kennedy and 169th. Down from there was a plumbing Co.where the Dedelow(oldest son became mayor of Hammond)family lived upstairs.

Used to take a bus to downtown Hammond and get off at Woolworths and head over to Goldblatts and go down in the basement and get two steamed hot dogs(buns steamed too) and a coke...all for a quarter. Upstairs on the 2nd floor they had a shoe repair where you would sit in an open booth in your stocking feet while your shoes were resoled.

Also on State Street there was a place which sold 78 rpm records and they had booths with phonographs where you could listen to the latest record before buying(or more likely for me,just listen to your favorite record without buying.)

One subject I haven't seen broached is teachers. At Morton High Albert Clark was the principle. 9th hour dicipinarian was named Ruff and he taught Latin. Miss Virden taught English. Mr. Flansburg taught algebra. Maury Zlotnik was the football coach. Other names: Chidester, Hand, Groves, Melton.

Hammond and esp. Hessville in the late 40's and 50's was a perfect place for growing up. I know change always comes and you can't live in the past, but I sure cherish those childhood memories.

jerry



Jerry:

My era was more the decades of the 50's and 60's, since I was born in 1949, but I agree that they were wonderful times and that Hammond was a fantastic place to grow up back then.

I was not from the Hessville section of Hammond, but I was not far from that area. I grew up on Woodward Avenue, which is only one block long and runs parallel to Calumet Avenue and two blocks east of it, from 165th Street on the southern end to Cleveland Street on the northern end.

The store on State Street that let you listen to records was Milliken's and was across the street from Minas's.

We sure had one great little downtown, didn't we? I've got an essay in here somewhere about Downtown Hammond that you might enjoy reading.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!






A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2007 :  18:49:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It does look somewhat like a door. But, look at the object sitting on top. Also, the bottom is not straight down to the floor. It is slightly recessed similar to the bottom of wooden phone booths. And, there is a sloped counter on the left with 2 phone books.

The vote is now: door = 1
phonebooth = 1
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2007 :  20:08:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Jim!
I've had this pic for a couple of months now and just assumed that the top of the "door" was a perspective angle from being open, but I'm sure that it's a wooden enclosed booth. Like you say, the bottom is straight across, not angled like the top as would be consistant with an open door; and there's the phone books on the wooden tray on the side. I don't know if you are from NWI or not, but they used to have one like it in Porter's Tap back in the 60's. The thing on top of the booth looks like a Coke display featuring a girl in a sailor cap and jersey.....CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/08/2007 20:52:00
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  09:26:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

Hey CJ... I'm not an antique expert, but that sure looks like the back door to me. As far as I can remember, the phone booths from that era all had the glass bi-fold doors.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960


I believe we are looking at the side of it. If you look closely just barely to the right of the edge of it, you can make out the doors. Also notice the wall tiles in back. The ones to the left are bigger than the ones to the right suggesting that the right side of the room is further back than the left side. Just guessing, I would say the difference is about the width of an old phonebooth. Enhance with your Photoshop, K!......CJ

Phone booth 2
Door....... 2

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/09/2007 10:00:55
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  10:06:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CJ... I'm convinced! I did notice the wall tiles earlier. Also, here is a phone booth I just found on eBay. It looks like the same thing. Ken...

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 04/10/2007 12:49:03
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  10:32:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you. You want something to do, K? I'm trying to find a photo of that Coke or Pepsi display on top of the booth. I have come across a million of them, but not that one. I would say it is circa 49-50..........CJ

Phonebooth 3
Door...... 1

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/09/2007 10:35:38
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  11:52:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CJ... I'll see what I can do. The sign appears to be a picture of a soda fountain waitress wearing a cap who is serving a Coke in a glass from a dispenser like the one in this poster. What do you think? Ken...



Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  13:51:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Every time I look at that thing I see something different. Your concept seems to take shape. I was seeing a girl in a sailor outfit by a cooler for a while. I must have gone through 20 million different Coke, Ebay and whomever else renditions of it, but not "IT".........CJ
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  14:14:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, I am a 'region' graduate - Harding and Morton, but left Hammond before being eligible to visit Porter's. Here is another photo with the side shelf for phone books.

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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  14:25:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The one they had in Porter's had a way of hanging up if you closed it all the way. Unless you knew the "secret", you became locked in there forever---or at least until someone stopped laughing long enough to open it for you. I wonder if it is at all possible that the one from Porter's came from the "Sugar Bowl" when it closed up......CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/09/2007 14:34:07
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  17:26:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CJ... I don't remember Porter's. Where was it located?

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  17:46:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken,

Porter's Tap was and still is located at 6405 Kennedy Avenue.

Edited by - Jim on 04/09/2007 17:48:15
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  19:28:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim,

Thanks. My list shows that in the 1950s 6405 Kennedy was Darnell's Food Shop (1956 Top Hat ad). Do you have any idea when it became Porter's?

The only bars I remember in that neighborhood are Flick's and Toomey's in the block between 164th Place and 165th Street. My girlfriend, now my wife of almost 44 years, lived just a couple blocks from there on Kenwood, and I walked her home from MHS many days on Kennedy past those businesses from 1957-59.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  20:12:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Porter(I think his name was Ed)acquired it some time in the 60's. By the way "Jim", the way things worked back then with Porter's, to become 'eligible', all that was required of you was to be old enough to walk.....CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/09/2007 20:13:20
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  20:23:38  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
You guys, my dad said that was true of Hessville all the back to the 20's when he was served as a 12 year old!
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  20:28:27  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
By the way Clark was just mentioned on O'Reilly as being killed by an "illegal alien immigrant"!
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  20:39:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
12 years old! He should have been working in the mills already.
Clark was in a vehicular accident involving yet another drunk illegal immigrant.....CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/09/2007 20:39:50
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2007 :  21:52:39  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
My Father never worked in the mills, graduating from HS when he was15. Liquor was just free and easy in the roaring 20's.
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2007 :  10:56:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It wasn't so scarce in the 60's, either........CJ
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2007 :  11:50:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Have you been gone a long time? Have you wondered what is there now?

This is what used to be the 5 & 10---now it is thin air!

This used to be Janc, You figure the rest.

Ya wanna see more?............CJ
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2007 :  19:42:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Nice photos, Chris. BTW, Janc's became Hutsler's (correct spelling) Restaurant somewhere around 1972. Nothing to write home about; I don't think it was even air-conditioned (I recall frequenting the place during the lousy-hot Summer of 1973). Sometime during the ensuing decade - perhaps the late 1970s - it became the Hessville Family Restaurant.

Also, Sip & Bite is now called the Kennedy Cafe.

Mike Rapchak Jr.

------------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

Have you been gone a long time? Have you wondered what is there now?

This is what used to be the 5 & 10---now it is thin air!

This used to be Janc, You figure the rest.

Ya wanna see more?............CJ

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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2007 :  19:51:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, OK, I’m busted. I have never been in a bar in Hessville and never knew I was even allowed in them. I don’t deserve to be called a “Region Rat”. There, I feel much better now. About the closest I ever got to a bar in my 20 years in Hessville was walking by Toomey’s on the way to Morton. But, I did enjoy their carryout fish dinners. As I remember we had either smelt or lake perch about once every other month on Fridays. That is, until the mercury levels got too high! These were my 2nd favorite carry-outs next to Hot Dog John’s.

During the early to mid 60’s my high school chemistry teacher Howard Besch lived in the apartment above Porter’s on the second floor in the back. Even though I visited there several times, I never went into the bar. I guess I will never know what I missed.

I may not be a Region Rat anymore, but I will always remain a “Mighty, Mighty Governor !!!!

Jim
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 04/11/2007 :  00:01:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Although I never knew about the Sip and Bite, I've had a long history with the Kennedy Cafe. This may be sacriledge, but perhaps not all changes (like the conversion of the Kennedy Cafe from the Sip and Bite)are for the worse. I moved away from the Region in 1978, and at some point after that, when I returned to visit the folks, they would always take me to Kennedy Cafe for lunch. The Cafe was run by a very nice Greek man and his wife. Their meals were very good, lots of variety, VERY reasonable prices and to top it off, you always got a dessert included in your meal for no extra charge. During the late 1990's my dad became ill, but would still go to the Cafe when I came to visit. About 6 years ago, he died and my mom died a few years after that. When I've been back, I've gone to the Kennedy, and that nice Greek couple still remembers my folks and talks to me about them. These are the kinds of people and memories that you won't get at a Perkins, McDonalds, or any chain restaraunt. So, while I realize that the Kennedy Cafe may not harken back to the golden days of our youth, it still holds fond memories for me. And thanks for the great pics of Hessville.
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