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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 08/27/2006 :  10:59:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Bill and others...
Here's a quote from an email I received this morning from a friend who still lives in Hessville and who lived on Crane Place when she was growing up. By "original school" she means the 1950s brick building.

"Harding is just about finished with the tearing down process of the original school."

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 08/27/2006 15:11:22
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 08/27/2006 :  20:05:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs


"Harding is just about finished with the tearing down process of the original school.



So sad...

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 08/27/2006 :  20:22:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, everybody, for the news ... though it is indeed sad ... I was actually considering visiting the old neighborhood, on a week off from work, last month.

The times we had there! And the memories! In fact, back in 1954 I met the girl I've been in love with for the past 42 years, in Miss Jordan's KG class ...

I'm especially grateful to all of you who've posted photos of the old buildings.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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brendasam1

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 08/29/2006 :  12:23:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have lived in Hessville since 1950. Went to Harding from k-8 class of 1960. Morton class of 1960. I now live at 2907 Cleveland street, yes the house Jean Shepherd lived and wrote about.
In the attic he and Randy wrote their names in chalk, it is still there. We have not updated much of the house. I still have the tub he use to take baths in. The same kitchen sink. Furnace has be updated, but still have the octapus arms. My husband and I are about to retire, may be putting the house up for sale soon. If interest watch the papers will post before doing so.
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babsy1

8 Posts

Posted - 08/30/2006 :  23:02:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OMGAWD! I can't believe I found this website-- reading all this has taken me back to places and feelings I'd forgotten completely... -- aww, come on you guys-- lemmee in!! Bona fides: I grew up in Lansing, went to TF South, class of "72. My grandparents, my bousha and jadji (spelling??... I know it was Polish) lived in Whiting, & we used to go to my Dad's Standard Oil company picnics at Whiting Park. Also shopped at Goldblatt's... does anybody else but me remember the "hootchie cootchie machine" at Goldblatt's, somewhere on the upper floors, by the elevators?? It must have been an old carnival relic-- a big tall wooden box with a glass case on top that had a hootchie cootchie dancer/puppet inside, who'd dance a little turn & then it'd tell your fortune. I was fascinated by it when I was little, thought it was vaguely "bad", and was ashamed to ask my Mom for the penny to get my fortune told. Sorry!-- am just reeling with memories here...

The very first time I ever saw A Christmas Story, my husband & I'd just returned to the States from being stationed in England from '84-'88, & I'd never even heard of Jean Sheppard. But it came on TV, and within minutes of watching it memory bells started clanging, & I thought, wow!... that store is just like Goldblatt's, and those houses look just like my grandma's house in Whiting... it was my childhood... and I love that movie to tears.
I also loved "Ollie Hopnoodle", which had to be set where, d'ya think? Wisconsin Dells? Michigan City? Saugatuck? We used to go on those "cabin on Lake Michigan" family vacations, too. I remember my Dad driving us in the big old Ford north into Wisconsin, & stopping at all the "Indian trading posts" along the way, with the rugs and bedspreads all hung outside.

As I write this, I'm looking at a particularly gaudy purple-flowered bedspread that my Mom bought on one of those trips back in the 50's , to send to her Mom in England. Well, I just came back from England with it last spring after cleaning out my other Gran's house there, & now it's on my bed-- clashes with everything I own & looks like a bad acid trip in chenille, but hey, it's crossed the Atlantic twice and it's a "Genuine Dells"...
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 08/31/2006 :  01:40:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Welcome.

Goldblatt's certainly was memorable. I do have to disagree with you on one point: I don't think the store in the movie was just like Goldblatt's (at least, not on the inside). Goldblatt's was very MIDDLE-middle class, not nearly as classy as, say, Marshall Field's. Or the store in the movie. And though the ceilings were very high, I don't remember them ever putting up a big tall Christmas slide like they did in the movie. Seems too fancy for the Goldblatt's I remember. Though I wasn't there every Christmas, and I can't swear they didn't.

I think the store was four stories high. It had clunky elevators. And if you were a young kid, climbing that stairwell on the northeast corner of the building (with windows between floors) made you feel very vulnerable, seeing the street so far below your feet.

Don't quite remember the hootchie-cootchie machine, though their shoe department on an upper floor did have a big fluoroscope machine that supposedly let you see how the shoes fit, when you peered through the viewer on top. Don't think I ever saw anything much through it. It was removed as unsafe, before I was very old. I think it was there that I got a Fearless Fosdick rubberband gun as a premium. And a Heckle and Jeckle comic book.

In the '50s Goldblatt's had an optometrist on the ground floor, where I got my first pair of glasses, and nearby, boxes of high-quality microscope slides for sale. They had a cramped book section toward the rear doors (counting Sibley Street as the front and Rimbach as the rear), where you could buy any Tom Swift Jr, Hardy Boys, or Tom Corbett Space Cadet book if you had a dollar. Most paperbacks sold for 35 cents.

Upstairs, tons of drapes and curtains and blinds, totally uninteresting to a kid ... except for the wall displays that had large gray posters of outdoor scenes, framed by the drapes as though you were looking out a real window.

In the middle of the basement, down a wide flight of stairs, was the big meat counter with lots of things like Polish kishka (the most revolting stuff I ever tasted).

Across the street was Kresge's, where I bought a large waxy plastic stegosaurus for 25 cents. And a man from Neptune. Should have kept them ... they would be worth hundreds of dollars, today.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63

Edited by - Bill Bucko on 08/31/2006 02:00:40
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 08/31/2006 :  08:25:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To babys1: I think the spelling is Babchie & Dzazie (that's what my niece & nephews call my parents). Also, the discussion about Goldblatt's reminds me of Almy's Department Store, which was a small chain in the North Shore of MA. I especially remember the one we had here in Salem. It was just like Goldblatt's, middle-middle class, but it had everything, even a shoe-repair department in the basement. It disappered in the mid-1980s' due to the rise of the local shopping malls, but there are plenty of people around here who still miss it.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 08/31/2006 :  10:27:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill,
In your response earlier this morning you mentioned Marshall Field's as being a classy store; and that it was. Have you heard that the Field's store on State Street in Chicago is becoming a Macy's? Also, I heard that the Carson's store on State Street is closing. I haven't heard anything about the other Carson's stores in places like the Woodmar Shopping Center in Hammond.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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jmosbrook

USA
15 Posts

Posted - 08/31/2006 :  10:58:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The department store where the movie was shot was Higbee's in the heart of downtown Cleveland, next to the big Terminal Tower. For its time, it was a big, classy store with many floors and lots of dark wood, old escalators, etc. It was not unlike a couple other big department stores in Cleveland at the time, or similar stores in virtually every other city. From what I have read here, Higbee's was much bigger and fancier than Goldblatt's. Today, Higbee's is also gone.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 08/31/2006 :  11:44:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I believe another member of this forum, SVEA3, mentioned at one time that the Christmas parade in Hammond during Shep's time there was sponsored not by Goldblatt's, but by a more "upscale" department store, Edward C. Minas. SVEA3 who graduated from Morton High School in Hessville (Hammond) in 1960 had older relatives who worked at the Minas store in downtown Hammond. It could be that using Goldblatt's in his stories was just another liberty taken by Shep.

One more point: If my family was able to shop at Goldblatt's, it was also available to the LOWER-middle class, not just the middle-middle class.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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momcat2000

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 08/31/2006 :  11:58:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Babsy, A Polish girl in Lansing? I thought y'all went to TF North like my cousin did, class of 71'. I thought South was all Dutch. My Polish gramdma lived in Cal City right on the State Line. When that area would flood, we had to go get my Grandma, Grandpa and Aunt in a row boat to get them out. My Aunt and cousins would come over from Shirly Dr. to my Grandma's house when the water started to rise.
My Dad worked for Standard Oil in Whiting also, but he was in sales and on the road all day with an office at home. I think they had to check into the main office in Whiting once a week though.
I also loved those 'faux' window in Goldblatts. Goldblatts used to give out a sort of 'green stamp' one would save in a little book. When the book was full you got some sort of discount or something. My Mom would take her receipts to an area near those 'windows', pay on her credit balance and get her 'stamps'.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 09/01/2006 :  10:11:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does anyone know whatever happened to Hessvillian, the member who started this topic almost a year ago? He posted only once; but I am very glad that he did. Thanks.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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UncleCarl

2 Posts

Posted - 09/01/2006 :  13:51:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So whenever you'd hear Shep talk about his mother in her red rumpsprung bathrobe with the egg on the label, working away at the sink, you'd actually be able to look over and see the real thing! HOw cool is that! (I have to resort to the images from "A Christmas Story".) I've lived in the area several years but haven't driven by yet. Do you get a lot of people stopping by?

quote:
Originally posted by brendasam1

I have lived in Hessville since 1950. Went to Harding from k-8 class of 1960. Morton class of 1960. I now live at 2907 Cleveland street, yes the house Jean Shepherd lived and wrote about.
In the attic he and Randy wrote their names in chalk, it is still there. We have not updated much of the house. I still have the tub he use to take baths in. The same kitchen sink. Furnace has be updated, but still have the octapus arms. My husband and I are about to retire, may be putting the house up for sale soon. If interest watch the papers will post before doing so.

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babsy1

8 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  00:35:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Alright am trying this again for 3rd time-- testing testing
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babsy1

8 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  00:48:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
great-it worked! Hi y'all & thanks for your replies! Bill Bucko-- I remember Goldblatt's basement & stinky meat counter too-- I could smell it on me all the way back on the bus to Lansing (used to go down there for these Dutch windmill cookies, with spicy icing & colored sprinkles.) Also remember Kresge's-- still have bubble Christmas lights my Dad bought there. And wvcogs, I remember Minas's too-- used to get prom dresses there.
But BTW Bill-- did you mean G'blatt's Polish sausage was revolting, surely not all Polish sausage? Dunno about G'blatt's personally-- my Babchie & Dzazie (thank you diskojoe!)made their own in Whiting, in a homemade "smoker" (read: modified Standard Oil drum). Dzazie would stay with us in Lansing in the fall, and smoke us up some too-- this great Polish sausage smell would hang over our house & people would come to our door & ask, "what is that stuff?". It was delicious. My cousin Susan ccaused family scandal when she was the first Murzyn in generations not to serve Polish sausage at her wedding-- big buzz round the tables: "well!!-- who does she think she is?".
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babsy1

8 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  01:07:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Momcat-- loved your rowboat story!-- I can just see that! & I've gotta look at a map, cuz I don't remember all these places. Were your grandfolks on the little Cal? I'm trying to think, doesn't the state line run up, 159th? I don't know how my Polish-descent father would up in Lansing-- he built our house there in the late 40's, & moved his English WW2 warbride there. My Mom hated it-- she'd liked Whiting & Whiting Beach & hopping on the S.Shore in Hammond to visit the Loop. And you're right, there were a lot of Dutch in Lansing-- I dunno which was settled first, Lansing or South Holland. But I recall a lot of everybody-- Polish, Italian, Irish-- but maybe that's cuz I went to Catholic school. I just remember classes with like 50 kids and one mean nun, and big families with a kid with the same face in every grade through eighth. I remember, with much shame now, we even had what were then called DP's-- displaced persons-- after the war, and unfortunately the kids were not always very nice to them. Maybe cuz it was a Catholic school-- St. Ann's on Ridge Road-- & they'd been involved in resettling & sponsoring Eurpean people after the war. I started there in 1960, & I know some of my classmates people had only within a few years been brought over from Eastern Europe. I wonder now if that was part of some Cold War thing?
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babsy1

8 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  01:24:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And brendasam1-- I'm not generally envious, but how I'd love to live in your/Ralphie's house. You must be the same lady I read the article about, somewhere on one of the jeansheperd sites. Do you do tours there, or is this basically your private home? I'm stuck in Norfolk, VA but if I win the lottery, I'd buy your house like a shot when you sell it! (Patsy Cline's old house up in northern Virginia was up for rent, & my sister was gonna rent it & stroll around in leopardskin capris there until she realized it was like a 75-mile commute to her then job!)
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ebruceb

USA
30 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  08:19:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Regarding the post from brendasam1: I've attempted to contact the residents of Shep's house several times, and my table with info about my Shep book was at the entrance to the Hammond Shep and A CHRISTMAS STORY fest, which I'm told they visited, yet I've never gotten any contact from them. Naturally I've wondered why. Perhaps they are shy, or just not interested in talking about Shep (or not interested in talking to me). They should be sure to take a good photo of the chalk names in the attic. I'd asked for such a photo. Well, maybe it'll happen one day.

Gene Bergmann
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  08:25:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
babsy1: You're welcome re: Babchie & Dzazie, but I don't understand what you mean by "Polish sausage". It's called Kielbasa. No talk like Amerkanskie . Anyway, your comments re Catholic school and how your family was scandalized by your cousin's refusal to serve Kielbasa really struck a chord w/me. Also, I was wondering if your father came directly from Poland or was his family here in the U.S. for a generation or two?
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2006 :  19:48:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[Those with weak stomachs, please SKIP this post!]

Babsy1, though kishka is Polish and (technically) is a sausage, kishka is not "Polish sausage." Polish sausage is actually sausage-colored, is found on civilized tables, and is part of the natural order of things. Kishka, on the other hand, is colored a revolting gray and black, so repugnant to sight, smell and taste that it must be a violation of the laws of nature.

As I recall, after I threw up a time or two, my parents excused me from attempting to eat kishka.

* * *
Different point, and probable source of confusion, to some: the Lansing referred to in some posts must refer to Lansing, Illinois (somewhere over the state line from Hammond), not Lansing, Michigan.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63

Edited by - Bill Bucko on 09/07/2006 19:50:21
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 09/08/2006 :  08:27:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I totally agree w/Bill re: Kishka, probably because I'm the only American-born member in my family. As for Kielbasa ("Polish sausage" to you Amerkanskies), now that's a diferent story. One of my favorite meals, if you don't mind me being a S-L-O-B in S-P-A-D-E-S, is Kielbasa w/Campbell's pork 'n beans, with toasted Italian bread w/the butter slapped on before putting it in the old toaster oven & a cold glass of milk. It will warm you gut right up!
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babsy1

8 Posts

Posted - 09/10/2006 :  15:00:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi y'all!!-- thank you Diskojoe & Bill B. for informative discourse re kishka/kielbasa/Polish sausage. Is kishka the godawful blood suasage stuff? If so, then bleck... I totally agree with ya both-- had immediate gag-reflex response recalling some family holiday "do" in Whiting where somebody brought blood sausage, & we kids were let to taste it, after which they told us it was made with duck's blood... double-bleck!!.

The Brits have a similarly awful dish called "black pudding". My friend Lindy (Amerikanskie-of-Hungarian-descent)told me when the Navy first posted her to England, she stepped off the plane at Heathrow starved for some sweet treat, so plopped into the first restaraunt & asked for a double-order of "black pudding", which she assumed would be some type of chocolate mousse thingy, but turned out to be 2 big stinky black sausages slung on a plate.

So, is kielbasa the collective name for all types of what I (formerly!;)) called Polish sausage? I ask, cuz another old friend of mine was Polish, & whenever she'd go back to New York, she'd bring back all different types of Polish sausage/kielbasa. I'm interested because I have a very very old black cast iron sausage grinder thing, that used to belong to my Dzazie, & I've been toying with the idea of trying to re-make some of his famous (to us!) kielbasa.
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babsy1

8 Posts

Posted - 09/10/2006 :  15:19:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Also, I forgot-- you'd asked, diskoJoe, about my Dad's heritage. Both his mother & father were from small villages a few miles apart outside of Cracow, I think. They both emigrated separately to the US & somehow wound up in Whiting sometime between 1900-1910, met each other, & married. They had 5 kids; my Dad being the eldest, and like so many other folks in Whiting, they all worked for Standard Oil.

I was still young when my Babchie & Dzazie died, & I never really knew their family stories. I used to ask my Dad, but he didn't know much either, & he said my grandparents had very hard early lives, both in Poland and the US, and so they didn't like to talk much about themselves.

I know my Dad was sent to St. Adalbert's school in Whiting, where the nuns taught him English & would slap him (& any other kid) if he lapsed into Polish in school. The nuns said the first-borns' whole families had to depend on that kid to interpret English & American culture for that family, so in the interests of family survival in this new country, no Polish was allowed at school-- only English.

That was "cultural diversity" in Whiting Indiana in the 1920's. Harsh but real.
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 09/12/2006 :  10:39:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
babsy1: Thanks for the info re: your family. My parents & brother & sister came straight from Poland in 1959-60 to Salem,MA, where one of my uncles (who came here before WWII)owned a bar & a package store (Massachusetts term for liquor store). My father worked for my uncle until he passed on & afterwards managed another package store called the Bunghole until he retired. My mother has worked as a seamstress since coming over here.

I totally understand the relunctance of your grandparents to talk about their lives. It was also interesting to read on how your father was treated by the nuns re: the use of Polish. My siblings, who were appx. 7 & 9 yrs. old when they came here, learned English straight into school (which was also a Polish Catholic school). They both speak perfect English w/o any accent. My brother told me a story about how he was at a party & someone told him that bilingualism was a good thing, whereupon he started talking to him in Polish !
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Tony Russomanno

2 Posts

Posted - 10/23/2006 :  12:05:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In 1966, Gerhard Kellner, the principal of Hanover Park High School in Hanover, New Jersey, approved the efforts of several students to build what was then only the third FCC licensed high school radio station in the nation, WHPH. That decision launched the broadcast careers of a number of students, myself included. Last year, I found out that Kellner was from Hammond and may actually have gone to school with Shepherd. The story I heard was that Kellner supported WHPH because he was proud of his association with Shep. We never heard that from him directly, but, looking back 40 years, it makes sense.
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2006 :  14:57:41  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
TILDEN???? I can remember that my number was 114 then Sheffield 114 and THEN TILDEN 0114!
Linda
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2006 :  17:08:13  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
My phone number was in the WEstmore exchange. WE-3-0308

You know, they were STILL using the letter prefixes as late as my senior year, 1967. I thought they had changed to all numbers before then, but in my 1967 Hammond High yearbook, The Dunes, the ads placed by local businesses showed phone numbers with the letter prefixes.

When DID the letter prefixes go away??? Anyone know?

Tom

Hammond High Class of 1967
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2006 :  06:04:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just had a look in my 1972 Morton High yearbook, and some of the ads still used Ti and We numbers.

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2006 :  08:16:28  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I wonder if there were a few years when people continued to use the letter prefix, even though the "official" listing had become all numbers? After all, the very same keys would be punched in dialing a given phone number, whether the number was listed with letters and numbers or with all numbers.

I remember Dad bought a brand new 1969 Ford Econoline van for his parking lot striping business, and the sign on the side of the van listed our phone number with all numbers. I don't remember the sign being changed from WE-3-0308 to 933-0308 anyway. I think it was 933-0308 to begin with.

Tom

Hammond High Class of 1967
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2006 :  12:09:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In addition to TIlden and WEstmore, there were interesting telephone numbers in some of the ads in the 1954 Hammond Morton High School Top Hat yearbook. Apparently these (and many others that I haven't included) had not yet switched to dial and probably still required operator assistance.

Teibel's - Dyer 3161
Dan's Garage - Sheffield 5517
Vierk's Furniture - Sheffield 320, 321, and 685
Baldwin Realty - Russell 7040
Logan's Tuxedo - Sheffield 5070
George Lamb - E.C. 916 & 6874

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2006 :  17:37:32  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Glad that you , Ken, remembered the time frame. My dad's business number was Sheffield 114- that was Johnson's Dairy on the corner of 173rd and Kennedy. [My dad was the fellow who would put up the huge XMAS tree in Hessville Park.]

I asked one of my 'know it all type ' friends what his recollection was. I remember moving into my house in GP MI in 1967 and the number was TUxedo 6-8167 Then it became 886-8167 when my daughters were young. That time has become a fog to me, and so I have nothing on which to hang a time frame. Things became clear when I bought my first computer, an Atari 800 in 1978. It was all downhill after that!I remember spending $3500!. We had a group that met in Southfield MI once a month to do programming. One of the guys was working on Monopoly. The rest of us were at the Space Invaders/ PONG stage. We had games from California before they hit the market. NOW that was exciting.

Does anyone remember the Mathematics/ Science group which met city wide in the late 1950's?

Linda J Harmon '60 MHS
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2006 :  19:59:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
By 1954, the telephone number for Johnson Dairy Service (Your Favorite Milk) at 7238 Kennedy Avenue had been changed to TIlden 4-0114.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2006 :  20:13:55  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Thanks again for clarifying! I can remember learning about Mr Tilden too. SO,I was in Morton Elementary School then with Judy Bogan and Billy Dedelow. I spent my entire school life at Morton from MISS Jane to Mr Ruff.
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DEEDEE

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2006 :  01:02:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I grew up in Hessville. My father grew up there also and has told stories about being the first (or second) kid in the "new" harding school. He got into a fight with another boy (Al)over who would be first. (I can't remember who won) He knew Shephard. The movie mentions "Grover Dill" My fathers name was similar. Does anyone on this forum have any information regarding that time and area? I also graduated from 8th grade at that little old school just before it was torn down. We lived in Hammond before relocating to Hessville. I remember the Flick's Tap that moved into the building that was previously The Nook restaurant ( on Kennedy Ave)where I caught a bus every morning to take me to Hammond Tech High School.
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2006 :  04:26:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by DEEDEE

I grew up in Hessville. My father grew up there also and has told stories about being the first (or second) kid in the "new" harding school. He got into a fight with another boy (Al)over who would be first. (I can't remember who won) He knew Shephard. The movie mentions "Grover Dill" My fathers name was similar. Does anyone on this forum have any information regarding that time and area? ... I remember the Flick's Tap that moved into the building that was previously The Nook restaurant ( on Kennedy Ave)where I caught a bus every morning to take me to Hammond Tech High School.

Welcome! Yes, several of us are from that neighborhood (and have posted our memories, on this thread and others). I posted a map, and several guys have posted rare old photos of Harding! Since your father knew Shep, he must have gone to the old wooden portable Harding (I went to the brick Harding for kg - 6th grade, and the wooden Harding for Junior High).

Glad you remember The Nook. I lived just a few blocks away, on Kenwood Street; and walked my girlfriend to the busstop at the Nook, in the 1960s, for the ride back to the Mayflower Home for Girls. Maybe you saw us!

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63

Edited by - Bill Bucko on 12/27/2006 07:15:28
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DEEDEE

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2006 :  15:43:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is so nice to read the messages about Hammond and Hessville. I lived in Hammond "Downtown area" until 62/63 then moved to Hessville (North Kennedy Ave). I went to Harding (brick building)grades 5-6 then the old wooden building grades 7-8. Then commuted to Downtown to go to Tech. I graduated in 71. I married, lived a short time in North Hammond and then bought a house in Hessville on Idaho. My first two children attended Harding (the brick building that is now gone). My dad (deceased) is not around to answer questions about the area back when he grew up and went to Harding. It was really fun growing up there. Not like most neighborhoods are now. I live about 50 miles Southeast of Hessville now. I did not know Hammond/Hessville had a rep. as being "Da Region" back then. I found that out when going downstate, talking to people. They would say, "oh, your from Da Region", like it was a bad thing. I never knew what they meant. After I moved away, I still had family in Hessville, and participated in the Little Red Schoolhouse Festivals.
I wonder if they are still having the Festival every summer.
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DEEDEE

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2006 :  16:19:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Me again, I would like to add that my Father worked for the Harbor Belt Railroad for over 30 years out of Gibson Yard (right by our house) and I still have family (brother and nephew) working for that railroad. My two sons are working for the EJ & E railroad. Must be in the blood! After reading more of the previous messages and looking at the old Harding, downtown Kennedy Ave pictures. I am lost in memory lane & no hurry to be found. Thanks so much, to all of you. I am glad The Times put this website in the paper along with the article about Jean Shepard and the movie.
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2006 :  18:23:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi DEEDEE! Looks like we were almost neighbors. I grew up on Idaho Ave, left the area (joined the Air Force) in January 1972. My dad lived there till he past away in 2003.

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2007 :  16:24:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Absoutely agree. Although I believe that you could actually cross the state line and be from Calumet City and still be considered a region rat. I'm from EC tho. Most of the folks in Highland, Munster and the like were people that "got snooty" and got a big mortgage and moved out of EC or Hammond. Gary folks usually moved south and east, to places like Chesterton.

Speaking of Calumet City - does anyone remember the old burlesque theaters that used to adorn the streets. They were all closed by the time I was festering as a youth, but I remember the old signs and marquis (sp?) that announced performers like "Cynthia the Body" and the like. I definitely remember seeing the one for Cynthia! Conjured up some wild images in this (at the time) young teenager!
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2007 :  12:23:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi All!,
I happened to blunder into this site while trying to remember the name of the drive-in that was located on 169th & Kennedy Ave, in the '67 era where the KFC is now.
After seeing reference to Dick's Grocery, The Nook, Tilden numbers (TI4-4846 by the way) and those old photos of the wooden Harding building I spent the entire morning wrapped up in the discussions concerning "Hessville of Olde" and could not pull myself away from it.
I still remember when you picked up the phone and heard, "Number please". You then had to give the number to the little voice to make the connection.
Solinas' Bakery..I worked in there cleaning the 20 million pans they delivered the rolls and donuts on.
After that, I worked in a little electronics repair shop called Triangle Repair, just a couple doors down from Hills Hammond Times Agency...I put time in at the Big Wheel on the boulevard as a short order cook when they still had a curb service. I survived the '67 Snow and Viet Nam, but I still can't remember the name of that drive-in. Can someone help me out?
Thanx,
CJ
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2007 :  13:39:25  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

Hi All!,
I happened to blunder into this site while trying to remember the name of the drive-in that was located on 169th & Kennedy Ave, in the '67 era where the KFC is now.
After seeing reference to Dick's Grocery, The Nook, Tilden numbers (TI4-4846 by the way) and those old photos of the wooden Harding building I spent the entire morning wrapped up in the discussions concerning "Hessville of Olde" and could not pull myself away from it.
I still remember when you picked up the phone and heard, "Number please". You then had to give the number to the little voice to make the connection.
Solinas' Bakery..I worked in there cleaning the 20 million pans they delivered the rolls and donuts on.
After that, I worked in a little electronics repair shop called Triangle Repair, just a couple doors down from Hills Hammond Times Agency...I put time in at the Big Wheel on the boulevard as a short order cook when they still had a curb service. I survived the '67 Snow and Viet Nam, but I still can't remember the name of that drive-in. Can someone help me out?
Thanx,
CJ



Was it the Pow Wow?

Glad you have joined us, CJ. Got any downtown Hammond memories to share? There is a thread in here on Downtown.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2007 :  14:00:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
POW WOW!! Yes! Thank you!
Oh yeah, I got a lotta stories. I am a 67 Morton grad. Most of my tales are from the Hessville area, though. At one point I lived right behind the Shep Cleveland Ave. house on 163rd Pl.

CJ
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  04:29:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It was indeed The Powwow. You shoulda checked out the thread on "Hessville Map":

"Ken (wvcogs) has very kindly posted online two versions of the large Hessville map I compiled (with helpful input from Ken and others):

a half-sized version at http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g268/wvcogs72/Hessville_Map.jpg

and a full-sized version at http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g268/wvcogs72/HessvilleMap1950s.jpg

(takes 2-3 minutes to display, using a slow dial-up connection; but worth the wait!"

I remembered the hangout, but not the name; it was Ken who identified it for my map. Per the phonebook, there is indeed a KFC there now.

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  09:46:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Actually I wasn't even aware of the map until after I had thrown the question out there. I see some blank spots on the map to which I can offer some upgrading if you are interested. Bill, did you go to Morton? That "Bucko" name seems familiar to me. CJ
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  10:12:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello CJ. I believe Bill will not be back on until late tonight, so I will jump in and answer your question for him. (Bill, I hope you don't mind.) He graduated from Morton in 1966. It would be nice to have some of those blanks on the map filled in. Some of the information that I provided to Bill came from the advertising sections of the Top Hat yearbooks that I have, 1954 through 1964 except 1955 and 1963.

While I was in school, I worked for a while at the Hessville Department Store that was just across the street from Solina's. Since I graduated in 1960 and went to school at IU in Bloomington, I'm not sure what happened to the store after that. I know that the owner, Nick, didn't stay around for long.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  13:00:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm going to add to the pot a little more. I see where people are referring to Cande's Pizza being on Kennedy Ave. I never knew the place to be there. I always knew them to be on 165th until it blew up. I grew up through the 50s & 60s on the 6600 block of Arizona. Every day we used to see a Cande's cook walk to work there from somewhere off of Parrish Ave. We knew him as "Billy Meat". One of my friends used to work there and we had devised a scheme where we would make bogus pizza orders at just the right time before closing. They would give all of the bogus orders to the employees when they left. I know that sounds sinister, but anybody who ever had Cande's knew it was #1 in the planet and therefore a forgivable transgression. Just for everyone's information, House of Pizza was considered #2. I live in Portage now, but I had to come to Hessville last Saturday and we ordered House of Pizza for the first time probably since the 60s. It was miserable!..........CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 01/30/2007 13:10:08
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  13:45:10  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

I'm going to add to the pot a little more. I see where people are referring to Cande's Pizza being on Kennedy Ave. I never knew the place to be there. I always knew them to be on 165th until it blew up. I grew up through the 50s & 60s on the 6600 block of Arizona. Every day we used to see a Cande's cook walk to work there from somewhere off of Parrish Ave. We knew him as "Billy Meat". One of my friends used to work there and we had devised a scheme where we would make bogus pizza orders at just the right time before closing. They would give all of the bogus orders to the employees when they left. I know that sounds sinister, but anybody who ever had Cande's knew it was #1 in the planet and therefore a forgivable transgression. Just for everyone's information, House of Pizza was considered #2. I live in Portage now, but I had to come to Hessville last Saturday and we ordered House of Pizza for the first time probably since the 60s. It was miserable!..........CJ



CJ:

I know for a fact that there was a Candes Pizza on 165th Street, because my older cousin and I would go there to pick up Italian Beef Sandwiches for the family. They had THE BEST Italian Beefs in the world!

I can even post a street address for Candes when I get home from work tonight. A high school buddy, a guy by the name of Art Peschke, whom I was visiting this past August, made me a photo copy of a certificate from Candes entitling him to a free pizza. He had won some kind of radio contest, and the certificate was signed by the famous disc jockey, Dick Biondi, and by Jan Gabriel of WJOB. Art decided to keep it and not use it for his free pizza, because he valued those signatures. A 165th Street address is shown on that certificate for Candes Pizza.

Tom


A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

Edited by - Tom J on 01/30/2007 13:48:39
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  13:59:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't doubt for a second that it was there, I just don't remember it there. I fact, I think I remember mom saying something about it there. I'll have to ask about that...............CJ
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  14:18:44  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

I don't doubt for a second that it was there, I just don't remember it there. I fact, I think I remember mom saying something about it there. I'll have to ask about that...............CJ



I'm not sure I understand your last post, but I was agreeing with you that there definitely WAS a Candes Pizza on 165th, like you said in your prior post.

Tomster

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2007 :  14:46:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Candes' Pizza -- the original location was at 6310 Kennedy Avenue. I remember watching the little guy standing in the window spinning the dough. My wife and her parents lived just a few houses around the corner in the 2700 block of Kenwood Street. That Candes' address came from the ad in the 1957 Top Hat. Sometime in the following year, Candes moved into a new building at 2844 165th Street. The ad in the 1959 Top Hat had the 165th Street address. I lived closeby on 165th when the move was made.

Tell me what you mean about it "blew up." That's the first I have heard of that.

I agree, Candes was Number 1...

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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