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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2011 :  09:56:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, that answers my problem, it wasn't there when I was spending time in Hessville. For a time in '58, I was eating lunch at one of the two drugstores. I thought the hot dogs at Fifields were the best!
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2011 :  11:33:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A hotdog, chips and a Green River----for 25 cents! How can you lose!!...Cj
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2011 :  15:39:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yeah!! I think they would toast the bun. Getting .30 cents a day for lunch-in two days I had enought for a comic book!
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2011 :  07:33:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
...a comic book that could net you a million bucks now if it's in pristine shape...Cj
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2011 :  09:07:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Would you believe my mother claimed to have given them to some kid down the street? I will say that I always reminded her of that mistake for years after. In all fairness, I still have all of my Lionel trains. I saw a Superman comic the other day that had written on its cover 'holding the line at $2.99'.
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2011 :  12:52:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey guys, I recently sat on the floor of my study for 3 days (well, for most of the days) and sorted through all the plastic remains of my great nephew's collection of Transformers and Super Heros 35 or 36 of which were Ninja Turtle figures, but there are Superman, Batman, Spiderman in various sizes, Dragons, and other monstrosities that come out of flying whatevers the names of which I have no clue.

My nephew is in between home/college/and the Marines and his parents had to move last year with the prospect of having to move again, so I volunteered to store some of his belongings. A humongous cardboard box bursting at the seams could not be stored in the attic or garage (Help Me, I'm Melting probabilites) so, here it was and I decided to open, sort, and repackage.

Laughing at my actions as I tried to make each Transormer into the smallest it could go, no way, could I do it for most of them, because, while the earlier ones were just twist and fold over, the later ones were pull apart here and reconnect there and I COULD NOT FIGURE THEM OUT!

So, my revelation regarding the imaginary super/underworld of the boy-child of the 90s and early 00s was that the imagination and ingenuity connected with the toys was somewhat of an education for him and it explains the seeming to be in another world when in the presence of family.

Boys (no matter the age) are always off in their heads destroying evil, saving the world, or just plain winning/conquering something. If a boy only has a stick to wield, he will imagine it a bazooka. (and I don't mean bubblegum).

All this to say, I now have a bit of insight into the molding of our boys into warriors by the "enterainment/corporate fantasy industry" but do not mean to be taking anything away from any of your experiences or the younger generation either. It is what it is, and from all I can discern from the behavior of the men on this site, you all can and do live outside the fantasy world, now, and I find your posts to be those of fine, upstanding, gentlemen.

It is because of your reminscences that I softened from one who held in disdain these toys. I realize the lives of men can be filled with everyday drudgery and constant pulls to do this and do that for others or because of others. Backbreaking work in whatever endeavor that is often just a way to allow families to survive with some modicum of comfort. So, I salute you each today as you have a bit of leisure to remember what was a time of play-learning. And, I would assume and hope you are continuing that play-learning in whatever way you have
to do so.
S C







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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  09:53:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
SC,has anyone ever told you, you're pretty cool? Well you are!
How do adult women feel about the toys of their youth. I guessing it's a little different.
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  12:05:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones


Boys (no matter the age) are always off in their heads destroying evil, saving the world, or just plain winning/conquering something. If a boy only has a stick to wield, he will imagine it a bazooka. (and I don't mean bubblegum).



I believe it was Jean Shepherd who wrote in one of his books something along the lines that a boy's lust for cold blue steel is insatiable. For those goody two-shoe parents who wouldn't buy their child a toy gun, he would just carve one out of a block of Lifebouy soap!
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  13:24:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey, thanks Jim.

I do not think my experience was one with which most girls would identify. While I had dolls before I went to KY, I never played with dolls after the age of 7.

I spent years 712 in Southeast KY on a a hardscrabble farm where most of my time was spent planting and tending corn, a garden, and tobacco and helping with the canning of the garden yield. The only toys I remember from that time: a cardboard acordian, a bicycle, and a plastic washing machine that actually held water. Pitiful, huh?

I DID have a favorite lucky glass shard that was my hopscotch piece. : ) And, I developed a love of reading, eye-hand coordination--I could hit a baseball, get a basketball in the hoop, and I loved to play games of marbles. And, oh, yeah-- I had a favorite handmade hook and a wheel rim, I could navigate up and down the hills. (Ever heard of that contraption?)

Toys for girls have never been very imaginative. I mean, "girl, here's a play kitchen, pretend you are washing dishes, washing clothes, ironing, cooking" and son, here is a hammer, go find some wood and make something". It is like girls toys were(are?) intended to do that which is done everyday while boys toys always left something to the imagination. Today, the technical world HAS to make a gadget pink to make it a girl's?

Okay, don't go there with the envy thing. I do not envy the role men have to play as this scenario has played out. I do admire those who can share the roles in a way that gives both a sense of creative contribution and have found that their children, male and female, have brains and inclinations and need space and support to find what they can best do.

Sorry, for my verbiage....

And Duane, I am happy to be of the same mind as Shep--thanks for sharing that
info.




















Edited by - S C Jones on 03/05/2011 20:25:27
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  13:41:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I was telling my story about 'Wesley's', I would refer to "Tim" as my partner in mischief. I just got a call from my brother this morning informing me that Tim passed away from cancer last night. His name was Tim Ring. He was 60, I believe. That is hitting home. I grew up with four Ring boys (and Jim Gasvoda who recently passed). They all lived down the street from me...Cj
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  14:47:29  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

When I was telling my story about 'Wesley's', I would refer to "Tim" as my partner in mischief. I just got a call from my brother this morning informing me that Tim passed away from cancer last night. His name was Tim Ring. He was 60, I believe. That is hitting home. I grew up with four Ring boys (and Jim Gasvoda who recently passed). They all lived down the street from me...Cj



Sorry for your loss of your childhood friends, CJ.

Tom
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  14:53:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CJ,Tell us something of Jim Gasvoda. I think I knew him.
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  16:42:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I grew up with Jim on Arizona Ave, 6600 block. He was a very athletic type and was inducted into the Hammond Sports Hall of Fame in 2002, where I am the furthest thing from sports that one can be. He also went on into real estate and bought and owned a Coldwell Banker Group.
I never really used to think much in terms of my own mortality until friends and family began to pass on.

This pic is from a 1966 yearbook...Cj


Edited by - seejay2 on 03/07/2011 16:43:26
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Paddy

USA
141 Posts

Posted - 03/08/2011 :  23:10:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

A hotdog, chips and a Green River----for 25 cents! How can you lose!!...Cj
After I delivered my week's collections for the Hammond Times each Saturday, I stopped in at the downtown drug store (Hohman and Rimbach?) for a Green River.
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2011 :  09:24:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks CJ, I knew him at an younger age!
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MHS-1965

1 Posts

Posted - 03/14/2011 :  01:13:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm an MHS grad ('65) and now living on the Texas Gulf Coast (Galveston Bay/NASA area.) One of my friends from Elkhart saw this site & thought I'd find it interesting. Reading some of the posts has definitely brought back fond memories of the old stompin' grounds & schoolmates. I played round ball with the Jim "GAS" Gasvoda...and, as a freshman/soph, had the privilege of practicing/playing with some of the other MHS sports legends...Ron Royer, Denny Palmer, Bob Guzek, Ron & Kenny Boken, Tom "The Bird" Hoppmann, etc. Look forward to re-connecting with any of the old crowd interested in exchanging past/present info about da Region. (
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

CJ,Tell us something of Jim Gasvoda. I think I knew him.

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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/14/2011 :  07:34:53  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Welcome, Mike! Glad you have joined us. I think you will have a good time here.

I was a couple years behind you and was over at HHS. I was in the Hammond High Class of '67.

Even though I didn't grow up in Hessville, I still enjoy reading all the posts as you guys reminisce. We were all part of Hammond and I can relate to most of what you guys talk about.

Tom
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Terry

USA
7 Posts

Posted - 03/25/2011 :  00:38:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[font=Arial Black][/font=Arial Black]

This message is in response to SeeJay2's note of March the 7th. SeeJay2 wrote about Jim Gasvoda. I worked at Calumet National Bank in the Mortgage Loan Department; Jim was one of the appraisers that did work for the bank. I knew Jim well for about 20 years. My wife (Jeri) and I would meet Jim and his wife (Cindy) at the Schererville Lounge frequently (we all worked long hours and there was nothing like going to "our Cheers" for dinner and a few drinks). Jim was smart, honest, kind, generous........He was loved and respected by anyone who knew him. He was a good friend. He sure is missed.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/25/2011 :  06:31:15  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
That was a nice tribute to your friend, Terry. He must have been a great guy.

I'm sorry for your loss.

Tom
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SoK66

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2011 :  00:33:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi, all. Stumbled across this Forum and wanted you all to know that there is a Facebook page dedicated to the 60s garage bands of northwest indiana. Hope some of you can jump in and add wat info you might have about that era and some of the local bands. Thanks!

Jerry McGeorge
Mystics
Blackstones
Shadows of Knight
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2011 :  08:22:02  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SoK66

Hi, all. Stumbled across this Forum and wanted you all to know that there is a Facebook page dedicated to the 60s garage bands of northwest indiana. Hope some of you can jump in and add wat info you might have about that era and some of the local bands. Thanks!

Jerry McGeorge
Mystics
Blackstones
Shadows of Knight



Welcome to Sheptalk, Jerry! Congratulations on your music career.

Could you supply a link to that Facebook page that you told us about? I tried to do a search for it but didn't have any luck.

I hope you will stick around and reminisce with the rest of us.

Tom
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class_of_66

20 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2011 :  17:05:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garage-Bands/170939559595841?sk=wall
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2011 :  15:40:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by class_of_66

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garage-Bands/170939559595841?sk=wall



Sorry, but I don't see the Northwest Indiana connection, except for comments of Linda who is from Hessville. What am I missing?
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class_of_66

20 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2011 :  17:53:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Exports circa 1964 Hammond Ind.

Band Members:
Ron Jongsma - Guitar
George Felaney - Guitar
...Tom Barnhart - Guitar
Howard Friedman - Drums
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class_of_66

20 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2011 :  17:56:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://www.vinylfool.net/sounds/Exports-Car.mp3
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 06/23/2011 :  00:52:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by class_of_66

http://www.vinylfool.net/sounds/Exports-Car.mp3



Good music, once you get past the 20 second introduction. Reminds me a little of the instrumental "Ratchet," by The Boys Next Door from Indianapolis--another talented group that never made it.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2011 :  18:49:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A couple more Pow-Wow images from another group



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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 07/07/2011 :  18:49:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great POW-WOW pics (which one is father and which one son? Both are youthful-looking dudes). The good old days when restaurant workers didn't get canned for not wearing platex gloves. We used to go there on Fridays in the summer for their fried shrimp dinners, which came in the plain white box. Tasty.

LR
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 07/08/2011 :  07:30:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pow Wow was on my daily cruzin' route, along with places like Park View and anywhere else that had carhops...Cj
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tommy51

35 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2011 :  20:03:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:


How about it Mike and the rest of you, do you recognize anyone?
I'm pretty sure of another; the lad with the white T-shirt,



The guy with the Morton shirt is Tom Kocur (sp) The far right guy has a last name of Gibson (Gibby?).

Tommy
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josnave

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2011 :  21:39:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am class of 59 morton high school, we went to 8th grade thru 12th. Harding grade school till 54.
the drive in had carhops on skates when we went there lol. my dad would not allow me to get a job there with those hussies lol. I lived on 163rd st right around the corner from Shep. His stories are the stories on my childhood, passed Flicks everyday on way to morton bought candy jawbreakers from Dicks or Pops as we called it.

J.
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2011 :  04:20:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Welcome! Yes, we called it Pop's. The store was narrow, but stretched way far back to the alley. Pop was the thin old man in back at the meat counter, to the right of the tall milk cabinet. He always wore a white butcher's uniform and cap. Milk used to come in glass containers with metal handles.

I wonder whether Pop was the model for Shep's Old Man Pulaski the candy hustler, or Oshenschlager the grocer with the heavy thumb. I think he might very well have been. In the late 50s, he seemed about 70 years old. So he was certainly old enough to have had run-ins with the young Shep.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63

Edited by - Bill Bucko on 07/28/2011 04:25:19
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2011 :  07:54:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Which house were you in, Joann? I lived at 2919 163rd. It used to be owned by Frank & Eleanor Horvath, my great aunt & uncle...Cj
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2011 :  08:25:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Joan, welcome to the group.
I graduated from Morton in 1960. My wife, Judy Thomas, attended Harding and graduated from Morton in your class of 1959.
One of my memories is that the 13th gallon of milk from Pop's was free. Does anyone else remember that?
Ken
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Jiieeggy

1 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2011 :  20:08:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello. I came across this website by accident, but what a find!!! This has been so much fun! I've enjoyed looking at the old photos. I was raised at 6749 Woodmar Avenue in Hammond near Hessville and attended Gene Stratton Porter Elementary near Purdue Calumet. I had great experiences and wonderful teachers at Porter Elementary. I saw my brother's name, Ron Royer, mentioned above and he just visited my family in Utah. We reminisced about Hammond and Morton. He had to watch me sometimes when I was about 3 or 4 during football practices at the old Morton High School and told me to yell cheers from the sideline like "Push him back, push him back, way back" so he would know I was there. He remembered Coach Zlotnik one time calling to him on the field,"Royer, your sister stopped cheering, go find her now." Coach Zlotnik was kind and giving. A few of the players including my brother didn't have money for football cleats and Coach Zlotnik dropped off cleats to our house saying an anonymous person donated them to the team, but Ron always felt that Coach Zlotnik bought them. Ron retired to New Mexico from coaching and teaching college chemistry. He mentioned visiting with Mike Bradburn this year. I remember some of the other players like Bob Guzek. I have some other fond childhood memories. I remember my sister, Tona, watching me while she worked as a Dog n Suds carhop. Sometimes, I long for a Dog n Suds chili dog, onion rings and mug of root beer. I remember swimming at the Hessville Pool all day and playing street games in the dark hearing my Dad's loud whistle from the next block to come home. I remember spending entire afternoons with friends at the Hessville Theater re-watching movies and the Hessville 5 & 10 cent store. I remember my Dad always buying me a treat at Goldblatt's. I remember the Woodmar Mall and River Oaks. I remember taking the South Shore Train with friends to downtown Chicago to shop or to watch a Cubs, White Sox or Bears game. I remember being on my Dad's shoulders waving at John F. Kennedy passing by in a convertible on the main street in front of Purdue by our house on Woodmar, maybe 169th Street? I remember loving pierogi as a girl. It was fun to make sauerkraut, potato and cheese pierogi this year for Christmas as well as polish sausage. I remember my Dad having a few close calls with the Mob as the head of a local union. I also recall one scary time when our family was leaving a restaurant and we saw men in suits push another man into a big car. My Dad confronted them and was told it was none of his business. Dad made us stay at the restaurant and call the police while he followed the car. He showed the police where they dumped his body. Every once in awhile, I recall something about Hammond. Just a few weeks ago, I remembered always asking my Mom to buy a favorite birthday cake with strawberries, bananas and whipped cream from a grocery store right above the old Morton H.S. on 169th Street. We always shopped at that store, but now I can't remember the name. It bothers me, so if anyone knows, please say the name. It might be an A&P, but I want to say a different name. Here's something else we were wondering about a while back. Why did our telephone numbers start with two letters? I can still remember my phone number. We all had different letters like TI4-3456 which was for 844-3456 on the rotary dial. Well, I have a lot of happy memories growing up in Hammond. We lived in such a great hard-working community with wonderful people! Thanks for sharing your memories with me. Deena
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2011 :  09:33:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the post and welcome to the forum Deena. I remember your brother, Ron, and Mike from high school.
hope to hear more from you in the future.
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2011 :  09:37:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That grocery store you mentioned is Strack and Van Tils on 169th. just north of the old Morton High.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2011 :  09:54:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Deena. Welcome to the group. It's great to hear all your memories about Hessville, Morton, and the area. Your sister, Tona, was in my MHS class of 1960. She wasn't able to attend our 50th reunion last year since her husband's HHS reunion was the same weekend. They returned to Utah following that Friday activity. Don't you also have a brother who was in the class of 1959 who had an office on Kennedy Avenue?
Stick around and share more of your memories with us. As you have seen, pictures are always appreciated.

Ken O'Neal
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2011 :  03:00:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Deena--

I enjoyed your post re: your many memories of Region life; hope that you will stick around and be our resident female (did that come out right?). I'm sure you've already checked out some of the excellent info and general nuttiness that prevails around here, and that we will be reading much more from you.

Larry Rapchak

PS--- guys....was that store a Strack and Van Til's in the good old days? I don't think so. There was a regular VAN TIL's at 171st and Indy Blvd during that time; I didn't think the Strack's moved to the 169th/Morton location until the early 70's (?)
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2011 :  07:50:13  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by HassoBenSoba

Deena--

I enjoyed your post re: your many memories of Region life; hope that you will stick around and be our resident female (did that come out right?). I'm sure you've already checked out some of the excellent info and general nuttiness that prevails around here, and that we will be reading much more from you.

Larry Rapchak

PS--- guys....was that store a Strack and Van Til's in the good old days? I don't think so. There was a regular VAN TIL's at 171st and Indy Blvd during that time; I didn't think the Strack's moved to the 169th/Morton location until the early 70's (?)




Uh, Lar, Deena can be our "other" resident female. Don't forget about S.C.

Welcome, Deena! We all hope you will stick around and be part of the family. It was very enjoyable to read your post.

Tom
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2011 :  08:17:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by HassoBenSoba

Deena--

I enjoyed your post re: your many memories of Region life; hope that you will stick around and be our resident female (did that come out right?). I'm sure you've already checked out some of the excellent info and general nuttiness that prevails around here, and that we will be reading much more from you.

Larry Rapchak

PS--- guys....was that store a Strack and Van Til's in the good old days? I don't think so. There was a regular VAN TIL's at 171st and Indy Blvd during that time; I didn't think the Strack's moved to the 169th/Morton location until the early 70's (?)


Larry, you are right. I used to cross over the tracks there behind what is now 'S&V' store. It's possible there used to be some little manufacturer of something or other there that I never saw in operation. I remember a lot of inidentifiable metal and composite material machine parts strewn all over the ground, but the wooded area served as a great place to commit some heavy underage drinking---as long as you didn't sit in all the poison ivy...Cj
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2011 :  09:36:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK you who have access to 60's directories please let us know what was located where S&V is now. We are talking the area between the Pow Wow on the east and the tracks on the west. When I lived in the 6600 block of Alexander from '76-'93 S&V and Ribordy(sp?)Drugs, then Little Ceasers Pizza was there.
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2011 :  10:21:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's the place. I would go up a dirt rise, cross the tracks and the area to the west (S&V now and St. Mary's Cemetary to the east) was wooded and debris, in the form of some kind of machine parts, was scattered all over the place. I can't say I remember any form of building there, but given the amount of crap laying about, I figured there had to be something there long ago.
Roger, did you know Marilyn Meyers? She lived in the 6700 block of Alexander, in a white house right in the middle of the block on the east side. That was one of the reasons I was familiar with that area then. This was 66-67 then...Cj

Edited by - seejay2 on 08/13/2011 10:28:31
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LegulusQ

USA
57 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2011 :  13:05:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi, Deena. Welcome to Sheptalk from another relative newbie. The two letters at the beginning of phone numbers were called the exchange. This was part of the identification process at the central telephone office regarding the origin and routing of calls. TI was short for TIlden (in case you didn't remember that little tidbit). I remember thinking it was a big deal when our exchange got so large that they had to add TI5 to the older TI4. It's strange that I can remember to this day the phone numbers of old chums of mine from that era, some of whom I haven't seen for years and some who, sadly, are no longer with us.

Seejay, I believe the name of the establishment who sponsored your long ago underage carousing at the site of the present day S&V was Dubois. That area was also a preferred spot for "watching the submarine races" back in the day (or so I've been told).

Craig

Edited by - LegulusQ on 08/13/2011 13:13:01
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2011 :  16:08:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OOPS----

Tom, that's right; sorry, S.C. But that's the beauty of Sheptalk--- it's like a happy family where reality is blurred, and class, ethnic, political....and I guess gender...distinctions are irrelevant (or some B.S. like that). Actually, it's my inability to remember names/identities via initials.

Incidentally, I think the TILDEN exchange was in honor of the dude who ran for president and lost to Rutherford B. Hayes c. 1870. Last summer I accompanied my mother to the hospital, and when the sign-in nurse asked for her phone number, my mother instantaneously said "TI 4- 7954"...before correcting herself (she's still pretty damned sharp). The point is, we hadn't used the TI-4 number in 48 years.

LR
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 08/14/2011 :  01:53:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Roger D

OK you who have access to 60's directories please let us know what was located where S&V is now. We are talking the area between the Pow Wow on the east and the tracks on the west. When I lived in the 6600 block of Alexander from '76-'93 S&V and Ribordy(sp?)Drugs, then Little Ceasers Pizza was there.



I walked south down Alexander Avenue on the way to Morton High from 1963-1966. Where Alexander ended north of the tracks, a well-worn dirt trail led up the hill to where we crossed the tracks.* Continuing on Alexander Ave. south of the tracks, the cemetery and, on the corner, the Pow Wow were to the east; to the west was nothing but weeds, in my time. This practically deserted stub of Alexander between 169th and the tracks was paved and had a sidewalk on the east; but I never saw a single vehicle on it. From aerial photos I see it is built up now.

* As far as I ever saw, people crossing the tracks there were ok with the railroad. There were old railroad ties fitted between some of the rails to help people walk across. On the other hand, if you walked down the tracks north of Kennedy Ave., the old man in the crossing shack was liable to pop out and warn you you were trespassing.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63

Edited by - Bill Bucko on 08/14/2011 01:57:54
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 08/14/2011 :  09:04:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CJ- I didn't know Marilyn Meyers. I moved to Alexander Ave. in the mid 70's. I was married with two small children,(7&5).
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Mrs Bears

USA
13 Posts

Posted - 08/14/2011 :  22:50:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My grandparents lived down the street from the Pow-Wow when I was little. This was the first drive-in I ever went to and had a hamburger. I remember they were large around.
quote:
Originally posted by Jim

A couple more Pow-Wow images from another group





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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 08/15/2011 :  11:48:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom J and HassoBenSoba (Larry),
(Larry, I don't know if anyone ever answered your question regarding which was which in the PowWow kitchen pic---Bob is on the right. He and Sarah were my bosses for the one summer I carhopped there.)

thanks for remembering my occasional presence on here. And now we have
Mrs. Bear. But, lest we get into a contest of numbers......

I just returned from my brother's funeral (Jeffrey Carl Jones, 68), he graduated Morton, but after he had spent a stint in the Navy, and I have lost track of his
year. He was living in La Porte--I think I misstated Parke Co. another post, that is where the Barnes' live now.

My older brother's children (in their 40's and 50's) and I drove up and stayed in
Merrillville. We drove up to Hammond to pick up their other sibling who lives very near Hammond High and St. Margaret's.

We were all amazed at the good condition of neighborhoods up 169th and 165th into downtown. The fact that there were not any of the behemoth "mac-mansions" towering over the characteristic houses of our childhood made the
trip a true trip back in time and houses where people and relatives lived in that day are still standing and look as sturdy as ever and a flavor of the distinctive
identity that is fast being lost across the nation.

The numerous small neighborhood stores are all boarded up, and there are still
old remnants of signs on them as well as some of the bars and local ethnic
restaurants the neighborhood population supported.

I could almost hear European (Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Italian) accents of our childhood as we turned from Indianapolis Blvd at what was my first workplace (Kelly's Drive-in) and is now Nicks Liquors and still owned by Nicholas Kikolas.

Big Wheel is still there.

The time was not conducive to exploration of my old haunts and places--and sitting in the back of a rental Chevy Impala with head supports on the front seats was like riding through in the trunk looking through the keyhole as far as being able to see a lot.

However, the "kids" got to reminisce about their childhoods in Da Region and we were able to share a couple pizzas with REAL ITALIAN SAUSAGE, though we did not get to go to one of the authentic pizza places. Old Chicago was the name of the place (a chain,I believe).

It is good to have this site reawaken. Thanks for all who join in the reminiscence.

SC




Edited by - S C Jones on 08/15/2011 11:51:06
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 08/15/2011 :  20:34:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey SC, I worked at the Serenade Drive-in, just next door to Kelly's in '60&'61. Great memories!!
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