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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2006 :  13:57:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have taken Bill's information about the location of businesses and other places in Hessville and added a little to it based upon my memories and upon information from high school yearbooks advertising sections from 1954-1960. We should now have a fairly complete picture of Kennedy Avenue in the middle to late 1950s from the north end of Hessville to 173rd Street on the south. The list is too long to post to this forum; so if you would like a copy of it, please email me and I will get it out to you right away as an email attachment in .doc or .rtf format. (If you require another format, let me know -- e.g., .pdf or html.)
Ken...

Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 01/24/2006 :  04:18:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs
I have taken Bill's information about the location of businesses and other places in Hessville and added a little to it based upon my memories and upon information from high school yearbooks advertising sections from 1954-1960. We should now have a fairly complete picture of Kennedy Avenue in the middle to late 1950s from the north end of Hessville to 173rd Street on the south ...
Ken...

Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
Added "A LITTLE" to it!?!? NOT SO!! Your list is FAR more comprehensive than mine! I had just one yearbook to work from; you had all those years' worth. And you caught so many businesses that to me were invisible. (When you're a kid looking for the latest copy of "Famous Monsters" or a model rocket, storefronts with "Insurance" or "Women's Wear" in the window might as well not exist.)

Why don't you go ahead and post it? Your list will take up no more of the generous Mr Clavin's server space than a couple of long paragraphs!

Best wishes,

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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jclavin

USA
45 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2006 :  21:52:44  Show Profile  Visit jclavin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'd be happy to post it if you send it to me

Jim
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regionairsdisease

1 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  02:29:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was born in Hammond in the early '60's and our family (sadly) moved to Munster because of the schools. I guess that the Hammond School Board wouldn’t raise a dilapidated Washington School, which badly needed replacement. My older brother was beginning 7th grade and this was the last straw. So we migrated to the other side of the little-Cal, but in no way turned our backs on my birthplace.
My family is steeped in Hammond tradition, as my great-grandfather owned a clothing store across the street from Goldblatt's. My dad didn't go into the business, but he loved Hammond, and when he finished his schooling, he decided to stay in the Region.
This may sound trite, but growing up in the Region in the 60's and 70's was like future tense. I learned to accept all races, nationalities, and religions--it was so diverse.

Here are some of my favorite Hammond memories:
The Paramount and Parthenon Theatres
The Calumet Theatre (we went to some skin flicks there in HS)
Made-Rite Hamburgers
Dietrich’s Ice Cream (the BEST—I think it closed in the late 60’s)
Prince Castle (long closed)
The elevator at Minas' (across from the Candy counter-I still dream of those weird arrows telling me what floor it was on)
The Army-Navy store, before it moved to 165th St.
Maruscheck's (still there?-great Corned Beef)
The huge ALL detergent box (across from Phil Schmidt's)
The model train store on Calumet Ave--I think they had a "store closing sale" for something like 20 years!
The McDonald's on Indianapolis Blvd before it was enclosed
Vince's Restaurant (OK, so what if it was in Cal City)

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momcat2000

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  12:00:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i went to washington jr. high. it was torn down 2 years after i got out. beatiful old building.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2006 :  09:33:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And, believe it or not, I was in high school at Morton when the McDonald's was built in the late 1950s at 175th and Indianapolis Blvd. Yes, the burgers really did cost only 15 cents each. The restaurant looked just like the one with the golden arches in Des Plaines, IL. that is pictured on the McDonalds museum web site.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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kball

4 Posts

Posted - 03/08/2006 :  14:17:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My rememberance of Hammond as a child is a fond time.

I grew up next to Hammond Muffler on Kennedy Ave. The street of my home was Gibson Pl. My Grandfather built my house. I use to play in the woods by the rail road tracks. My brother worked at Chuck and Irenes. We use to play baseball in Flick's parking lot. I went to Warren G. Harding K-6, Morton Middle, and Morton Sr High.

I remember getting my haircut at Auggy's barber shop next to Kenwood bowling alley. Papa B's pizza was great.

I remember my parents sending us to Dairy Queen on Sunday afternoon so they could have the house to themselves. I remmeber that Lost Park (Gibson park) use to have people there during the summer so you could make crafts and play that wood hockey game.

My father and Grand father worked for Bainbridge delievery fuel oil.

My wife lived on Cleveland St.

I remember going to Delocks to buy candy. Best memory was missing a day of school because of the blizzard of 79.

Oh those days!!!!
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  00:00:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Welcome!

Sounds like you went to Harding a few years after my time.

Was the old wooden portable Harding still there? During the 50s and 60s, KG through 6th grade went to the brick Harding, while the gym and 7th and 8th grades were in the portable.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  10:03:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For those who haven't found it, there is a picture of the old wooden school at http://www.hhs59.com/harding.htm. This site is linked from Mr. Clavin's www.flicklives.com site. My wife was a mid-term Harding "graduate" during the 1954-55 school year, and then went to Morton for high school. There is a picture of the brick building in 1950 on the Harding School web site - www.hammond.k12.in.us/HardingES/" target="_blank">www.hammond.k12.in.us/HardingES/" target="_blank">http://www.hammond.k12.in.us/HardingES/.

A new school is being constructed next to the present school and will be ready for use in the fall 2006.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 03/09/2006 10:58:29
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kball

4 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  17:25:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
good to see that the school has grown enough for a new building. But it saddens me as well. The site of the new building use to be the teachers parking area. There was a fence that seperated the parking from the playground. We used to play kick ball there and over the fence was a home run!!!

Ok this may not be the right area but how many can remember your teachers at harding?

K. Mrs. Wild
1st Mrs. Plum (My favorite)
2nd ???
3rd Mrs. Galvin
4th Mrs. Maholic (Cutest)
5th ???
6th Mrs. Calohan
Gym was Mr. McNott <sp>
Music Mrs. Graham (that was her maiden name. she got married when I was in 5thish)
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kball

4 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  17:34:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Bucko

Welcome!

Sounds like you went to Harding a few years after my time.

Was the old wooden portable Harding still there? During the 50s and 60s, KG through 6th grade went to the brick Harding, while the gym and 7th and 8th grades were in the portable.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63



No the old school was gone. Just the empty lot accross the street. My Mom and Dad was from around that time frame. Dad was born in 43 and Mom in 44. So I guess that would make them class of 57 around there.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2006 :  14:03:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kball

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Bucko

Welcome!

Sounds like you went to Harding a few years after my time.

Was the old wooden portable Harding still there? During the 50s and 60s, KG through 6th grade went to the brick Harding, while the gym and 7th and 8th grades were in the portable.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63


No the old school was gone. Just the empty lot accross the street. My Mom and Dad was from around that time frame. Dad was born in 43 and Mom in 44. So I guess that would make them class of 57 around there.


Hello Governor!!

Did your parents also attend Harding and Morton?

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2006 :  19:26:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm currently reading The Brothers Bulger, about Billy & Whitey Bulger, the Boston politician and his Most Wanted Mobster brother(for 10 yrs. & counting) respectively, by Howie Carr, the Boston radio talk personality & newspaper columnist. According to the book, it seems that Whitey paid a little visit to Hammond, IN in October, 1955. His purpose was not to check out sites associated with Shep's life, but to rob a bank . He first cased the Mercantile National Bank, but abandoned the plan when he & another member of the gang saw a policeman in the bank. A few days later, they robbed another bank in a shopping center in Hammond, which netted them $12,612.28. It also netted him a 20-yr. federal jail sentence when he was caught & tried the next year, of which he served nine, spending some of it in Alcatraz. It's a good book if you're interested in true crime and/or politics (can you tell the difference?, Shep LOL)& I just want to pass along the Hammond, IN connection.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 03/21/2006 :  10:59:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by diskojoe

I'm currently reading The Brothers Bulger, about Billy & Whitey Bulger, the Boston politician and his Most Wanted Mobster brother(for 10 yrs. & counting) respectively, by Howie Carr, the Boston radio talk personality & newspaper columnist. According to the book, it seems that Whitey paid a little visit to Hammond, IN in October, 1955. His purpose was not to check out sites associated with Shep's life, but to rob a bank . He first cased the Mercantile National Bank, but abandoned the plan when he & another member of the gang saw a policeman in the bank. A few days later, they robbed another bank in a shopping center in Hammond, which netted them $12,612.28. It also netted him a 20-yr. federal jail sentence when he was caught & tried the next year, of which he served nine, spending some of it in Alcatraz. It's a good book if you're interested in true crime and/or politics (can you tell the difference?, Shep LOL)& I just want to pass along the Hammond, IN connection.

Thanks for the connection. That had to be the Hoosier State Bank in the Woodmar Shopping Center since Woodmar was the only shopping center that I know of in Hammond at that time.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 03/21/2006 :  12:51:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for providing the name of the bank. It wasn't mentioned in the book & I figured that some Hammond homeboy would provide the information. Who knows, maybe Whitey's actually back in Hammond !
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2006 :  04:27:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

For those who haven't found it, there is a picture of the old wooden school at http://www.hhs59.com/harding.htm ...

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

OMIGOD, OMIGOD, OMIGOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Ken, THANK YOU!!!! I somehow MISSED following this link when you first posted! I just now discovered it! YES, that's a photo of (part of) the old wooden portable that Shep attended (as did I, for Junior High, 1961-1963). It was NOT "demolished in the 1950s," it was around at least through the time I was there.

This photo appears to date from the 1940s or early 50s. When I started walking past it each day on the way to the brick building (one block to the east, on the right) in 1954 it had more modern street signs.

What you're seeing here is part of the wing that stretched along Cleveland Street. The taller part on the right is the gym. I do remember this wing being a bit longer.

Thinking of the bldg as U-shaped, this is the right-hand part of the U you're seeing.

The library, and most of the classrooms I was in, were in the bottom of the U. The right-hand wing, except for the gym, during my time was used for I'm not sure what, special ed or perhaps a few elem. classrooms they didn't have room for in the brick bldg. We 7th and 8th graders never entered this wing, except on the way to gym.

In my time, the flagpole was located on the asphalt area by Cleveland Street, near the entrance in this photo. Since it doesn't show in this photo, it obviously wasn't around for poor Flick to get his tongue stuck to it

The 2nd photo on this web page is not of the portable. You can tell from the tiled walls that this was taken in the 1950s brick Harding.

The 3rd photo, I'm pretty sure, was not taken on Cleveland Street but on Delaware Avenue. You're looking here at the NW corner. (Note the different shape of this corner. The SW corner did not bulge out like this, it was a simple right angle.) Delaware on the left, 163rd Place in the background. (Definitely no horses in my time--I'm not THAT old!)

Thanks again, Ken!!

Bill




Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 03/28/2006 :  06:23:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all! I grew up in Hammond, 6800 block of Idaho Ave., corner of Idaho and Martha, third block due south of Harding. I attended Harding K thru 7th grade, Morton Middle for 8th grade, and Morton High 9th through 12th, graduated in '72.

I remember them tearing down the old Harding in the summer of 1967. All the "middle school" studends transfered to the old Morton High building as the new Morton High was opened for classes fall of '67.

I have lots of memories of the Hessville area, as well as many memories of the stories my father told me (he was a couple years behind Shep in school). He grew up two or three streets due north of the old Harding building.

I also still have my 1967 Harding yearbook (The "Scroll") and if I can get my scanner working again, I'll post some pictures of the old building from it.

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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m10bob

USA
233 Posts

Posted - 03/28/2006 :  09:44:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That would be great Jim R.
We wanna see the flagpole!!!

In Hoc Agricula Conc
In Est Spittle Louk
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2006 :  04:01:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, Jim R, any more pictures would be great!

Re:
"Harding Elementary School- The original school that Shep attended was constructed in 1924 at 3107 Cleveland Street. After a fire, a replacement structure built in 1949 at 3211 165th Street, with additions made in 1957 and 1961."

I don't believe that is correct. The wooden portable that I attended 1961-1963, on the 3100 block of Cleveland, showed NO signs, inside or out, of ever being damaged by fire; I never heard mention of any fire; and the building obviously was several decades old.

The bottom of the U (along Delaware Avenue) was slightly older than the two side wings. There was no sign of this on the outside, but on the inside you could see a line in the floor where the two side wings were joined on. The woodwork of the side wings definitely looked a little newer.

The brick Harding at 165th and Parrish, that I attended 1954-1961, did NOT "replace" the old wooden portable. It supplemented it ... as evidenced by the fact that BOTH were in use, all the years I was there.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 03/29/2006 :  06:07:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree completly with the above post. But I have a question, why does everyone refer to the old wooden building as "the portable"?

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 03/30/2006 :  09:20:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Damfino (pardon my French). But it was ALWAYS called that, in my time: by teachers, students, even by the principal.

I heard a rumor that it had once stood where the brick Harding now stands. That was only hearsay, and I only heard it once or twice.

The bottom of the U (which, as I've said, was the oldest part) was quite large, and it boggles the imagination to think it could ever be moved. Perhaps that kind of construction is called "portable" simply because it could be moved, not necessarily because it ever was.

It certainly was roomy. Large classrooms with tall ceilings on either side; and a large, wide corridor down the middle. Nothing cramped about it. We kids did occasionally sing, "Mine eyes have seen the glory of the burning of the school," but we were just being kids. It was a nice place. We miss it.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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m10bob

USA
233 Posts

Posted - 03/30/2006 :  18:29:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don't think this is totally OT, but as far as "portability" is concerned, maybe it was considered "portable" like the Army considered those wooden barracks as "temporary", (even though they lasted forever).
On an Army base, all structures are considered "temporary" unless they have a masonry foundation.
Here in Indy, in the World War Memorial, are pictures of a 6 story office building which used to stand where the memorial now sits.
The pics show (in detail) that entire six-story building being moved across the street, (to the east on Pennsylvania), and the building still stands there, with a new and ornate facade built onto the old "rear" of the building.
In the end of the nineteenth century, and early in the twentieth, it was fairly common to see homes,etc being moved on flatbed trucks.
I have seen this done myself maybe 10 times, (as I'm sure everybody my age has?)

In Hoc Agricula Conc
In Est Spittle Louk

Edited by - m10bob on 03/30/2006 18:31:01
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 03/30/2006 :  20:53:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by m10bob

Don't think this is totally OT, but as far as "portability" is concerned, maybe it was considered "portable" like the Army considered those wooden barracks as "temporary", (even though they lasted forever).
On an Army base, all structures are considered "temporary" unless they have a masonry foundation.]...

In Hoc Agricula Conc
In Est Spittle Louk

I think you're right. They probably called it that because of the foundation.

I RARELY heard the wooden building called anything ELSE but "the portable." Maybe once in a while it was referred to as "the junior high," but otherwise, it was ALWAYS "the portable."

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/02/2006 :  10:33:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My wife started attending Harding in January (mid-term) 1947 when it was just Harding School. To her that's all it ever was -- never the portable or temporary -- even though she did move into the brick building when it was finished a couple years later.

For what it's worth, check out this page on the Hammond history site: http://www.hammondindiana.com/history/harding.htm. It refers to the "Harding Park Historic District." Actually, it is just the 3100 block of 163rd Place, just across the street from the north side of the old wooden Harding School. The page mentions in error that "The Harding Park Historic District is located in the northern section of the city in an area commonly called 'Hessville'". Actually, we all know that Hessville is located in the far southeastern section of the city of Hammond.

Bill -- I did email the web master who posted the Harding School photos and told him that the center photo was not of the interior of the wooden building because of the tile wall and the lockers. Also, notice that the date on the photo, April 1950, is the same as the date on the photo of the original brick building that appears on the Harding web page. He responded, and said that he would make the change to point out that the lost and found photo is in the brick building, but I haven't seen the correction yet. Also, I agree that where ever the information about the fire came from is completely inaccurate. The wooden building did not burn. Just check Jim R's post about the building being torn down in summer 1967 when the replacement Morton was built. (Was it really possible to replace the old 7040 Marshall Avenue?)

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2006 :  21:42:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Growing up three streets south of Harding, we always refered to the area as Hessville.

quote:
Was it really possible to replace the old 7040 Marshall Avenue?


Once when I was down there visiting, I drove by the old Morton High, it was gone. A new building was under construction.

Anyone remember Tilden 4 and Tilden 5?

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2006 :  07:10:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Of course we remember TIlden ... Hessville's phone exchange.

In those days phone numbers were always two letters, followed by numbers ... for instance, Tilden 4 - 4191.

Good grief! You might as well ask whether we remember the Dog and Suds sign, on Kennedy Avenue ... with the dog looking a bit like Disney's Goofy. (This was the '50s. Past Shep's time.)

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2006 :  10:05:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:

Anyone remember Tilden 4 and Tilden 5?



TIlden 4-6708 -- My girlfriend's (and now my wife of almost 43 years) telephone number on Kenwood Street

TIlden 5-1701 -- My telephone number on Carolina Avenue

How in the world do I remember them after all these years???

Do you remember when Mr. Dowling who lived in the 2700 block of 163rd was mayor of Hammond in the 1950s? My wife's family lived almost just across the alley on Kenwood.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2006 :  09:10:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Based upon information that Jim R posted, I was able to get the webmaster to update information about the wooden building on the http://www.hhs59.com/harding.htm web site. Unfortunately, he listed me as a former Harding student. Oh well, at least the information is changed and I am from Hessville. If you haven't done so yet, take a look at the pictures on the page. The top photo is of the side of the school along Cleveland Street. The center photo is the side along Delaware Avenue.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2006 :  13:56:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a picture of the front of the building (bottom of the "U"), taken during the winter of '66/'67. Here's your flagpole, folks!

http://img478.imageshack.us/my.php?image=hardingflagpolelarge8zr.png

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2006 :  21:24:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Golly, THANKS!!!! That's almost exactly as I remember it!

Actually ... wait a minute, maybe I'm confused. You say this is the bottom of the U?

At first I was going to say no, I believe this is the right side, i.e. the Cleveland Street side (south facade), not the Delaware Avenue side (west facade).

I do remember the flagpole being on the Cleveland Street side, during my time there.

There were two main entrances: one on Cleveland, near the SW corner, and one on Delaware Avenue (close to the middle) (though it doesn't show up in the photo with the horse).

The first photo at hhs59, is DEFINITELY the Cleveland Street side, since we can see the gym at the end. There's no mistaking it.

I notice the trees are different, in your photo and the first one at hhs59.

The more I look at your photo, the more I'm coming to accept that it's the Delaware Street side. I think I do remember that big evergreen.

YES, you are right!! The lawn on the Delaware side was DEEPER than the little bit of lawn on the Cleveland Street side! That is apparent in both your photo and the one with the horse.

There must have been two flagpoles ... one on Cleveland, and one on Delaware. (I.e. one near either major entrance.)

THANKS!!!!

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2006 :  00:46:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well. the flagpole is not on the Cleveland Street side in the hhs 59 photo, and it's not in the 66/67 Cleveland Street photo I have (having trouble scanning this one), so I don't know. I do know that the Delaware Street entrance was directly acrossed the hall from the school office, so it seems logical that that's where the flagpole would be.

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2006 :  01:12:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://img46.imageshack.us/my.php?image=clevelandst6ek.jpg

Not real clear, but here is the Cleveland Steet side, you can see the brick Harding building in the background. Also take during the winter of 66/67.

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2006 :  02:50:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WOW, THANK YOU!! THANK YOU!!

THIS photo brings back even more memories than the others!

That is indeed the brick Harding in the distance, to the right. To the left you can see the brick building's boiler room and smokestack.

I do have pretty distinct memories of patrol boys hoisting the flag by the Cleveland Street entrance. I recall we usually had to line up on that side of the building, when coming in from recess. So I'm going to stay out on my limb, and say there was a flag pole there for a few years, but not earlier or later.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2006 :  09:38:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim R -- I hope you don't mind, but I passed the link to your Cleveland Street photo on to the webmaster of the HHS59 web site and he posted it to his Harding School page along with the three photos that were already there: http://www.hhs59.com/harding.htm.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/20/2006 :  14:16:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you haven't seen it yet, take a look at Bill Bucko's new topic -- Hessville Map -- on this forum where he has posted links to a map that he prepared of Hessville in the 1950s. It includes details of the Harding School grounds, both the old wooden school and the newer brick one.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  09:47:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you would like to see what beautiful downtown Hessville looked like in about 1954, take a look at this scanned image of a black and white post card. These are the 6700 (in the distance) and 6800 blocks of the east side of Kennedy Avenue. The Pin Bowl was on the west side and is not visible, sorry. It was across from the light colored two story building in the distance (Vierk's Furniture).
http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g268/wvcogs72/KennedyAve.jpg
These buildings were old at that time, and probably look much the same in this photo as they did in the 1930s and 1940s.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 06/04/2006 10:12:55
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  21:32:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, thanks. Just this side of the Ace Theater (visible in the photo) stood Janc's Pharmacy (now a diner), at the intersection of Martha St. Just a half block to the east (right) on Martha St. was the Hessville Library. The beautiful stone building is still there, though now used as a YMCA office building.

Shep's neighborhood was about half a mile north, and a block to the east. Morton HS would be several blocks south, and one block to the west.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 06/05/2006 :  12:14:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Bill and others,

All those distances seemed much greater when we were young and walking to school on Kennedy Avenue. Actually, Morton HS was just two blocks south and one block west of the location of this picture; but it seemed like a whole different world to us. There was this beautiful three story, art deco style building right in the middle of an established residential area. Has anyone ever seen a building more beautiful that this?

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g268/wvcogs72/Morton1961.jpg

Well maybe you have, but this one that was torn down in 1991 has a lot of memories for those of us who attended school in Hessville (Hammond) from 1937 when it was built and served as a school through the tenth grade. It was a four year high school from 1953 until 1967. (Please excuse the bad spot in the picture, but that is from the original that I scanned.)

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 06/05/2006 :  22:57:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, distances did seem longer then.

BEAUTIFUL photo. And Morton was one of the TOP high schools in the state. Though perhaps better known for sports achievements (which I'll pass on, not being a sports fan ... though I think Morton won the state football championship repeatedly), it produced a young electronics wizard who tapped into the phone company's lines (a forerunner of computer hacking), not to defraud them but merely in pursuit of knowledge (when caught, he was reportedly encouraged to pursue his technological career, though along legal lines), and a young lady who, even before graduating, spent time in the University of Chicago's labs dissecting rats in original cancer research. The debating team won the state championship repeatedly.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2006 :  19:49:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And my beloved girlfriend went on to Bloomington, where she had a job analyzing data from the Indiana University cyclotron. We were not a high school of Bumpuses or Farkases. (With apologies to any current members of those families who are more evolved than their progenitors, as portrayed by Shep -- or perhaps caricatured by him.)

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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wvcogs

USA
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Posted - 06/14/2006 :  19:54:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
College professors, rich businessmen (and women), retailers, members of the clergy, steel workers, government employees, truck drivers, unemployed drunks on welfare, and many others -- we have all kinds in my class of 1960 from Morton.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite - "da Region"
Morton Graduate 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 06/14/2006 20:09:15
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KathyM

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Posted - 06/15/2006 :  10:04:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hessvillian

Is anyone on this board actually from hammond?

I grew up there all my life and attended harding k-5.

I actually have 2 friends that live on Cleveland St. one on either side of his house, and one is almost directly across the street.



HMD IND - My Roots.

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KathyM

2 Posts

Posted - 06/15/2006 :  10:16:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was born and raised in Hammond. I went to Edison elementary and graduated from Hammond High. My dad retired from Inland Steel. He knew Jean Shepherd through some co-workers (I think they went to school with him), but this was in the 1960's or 70's, and Shep was long gone from Hammond by then.

My family is originally from Ohio, but my parents moved to Hammond in '59 or '60 so my dad could find work. They lived with my dad's parents, who moved there because my grandpa took a job as captain of an oil carrier, stationed in East Chicago. Hammond was still a good place to live back then. My grandmother especially enjoyed living there and missed it when they returned to Ohio after my grandpa retired.

I left Hammond after graduating in 1980 and never went back. It was a very depressing place--quickly becoming a ghost town because of the recession. Now there are casinos and strip joints--and Cabela's is taking the place of Woodmar Country Club/golf course--so the Hammond of "A Christmas Story" is forever gone.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 06/15/2006 :  12:19:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Kathy M and welcome.

Yes, Hammond (especially Hessville ) was a good place to grow up way back when; but my wife and I moved away from there in 1975 and have not been back since her mother's death in 1988.

Even though you did not attend Morton, there still is a certain closeness since you attended a school (Edison) that was built at the same time and from the same plans as our old beloved high school on Marshall Avenue.


Ken...
Former Hessvillite - "da Region"
Morton Graduate 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 06/17/2006 08:50:31
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Dave

USA
30 Posts

Posted - 06/21/2006 :  12:38:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, kathym and wvcoqs, what is wrong with Hammond of today? You are taking nostalgia to extreme limits. Things change, sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse, and sometiimes just different. (I hope you are not complaining about differences in the ethnic and racial makeup of the city?) I am sure there was plenty of (illegal) gambling and plenty of (semi-illegal) strip clubs back in your day as well.
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 06/21/2006 :  22:23:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave et al.

I don't think I said there was anything wrong with the area, just that we haven't been back since 1988. When you no longer have any family in the area and the area has no special attraction any longer, there just isn't any reason to return. Anyway, here is the reason we left if you really need to know.

When I left the area in 1975, I did so for the safety and security of my family. We lived in Munster and I worked in Gary (the city just east of Hammond). At that time, Gary was just beginning on its trek to becoming the per capita murder capital of the United States. Just a month before we moved, there was a murder in the alley just across the street from the place where I worked. Since 1975 we have lived in a small town in a small state that has one of the lowest crime rates in the country.

By the way, we didn't need any semi-legal strip clubs in Hammond back in the 1950s when there were plenty of legal ones just across State Line Avenue on State Street in Calumet City, Illinois. And, I'm sure there was plenty of back room gambling in the bars in the area; but that didn't bother me. In fact, my future father-in-law at the time would stop almost every day after work at one of the bars near the mill gate in Indiana Harbor to have a few drinks and play some cards.

Hammond was a great place. I cannot speak for it now since I haven't been there since 1988.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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Dave

USA
30 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2006 :  22:58:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken, Kathy,

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so harsh. I am very fond of the region. I'm not even a resident or native (but I have a lot of friends and family in Hammond, Whiting, etc.). I think the nostalgia makes us forget that the region was always firmly blue collar working class with some seedy edges to make things interesting. (Although you might be pleasantly surprised if you take a drive through Downtown Hammond nowadays.)
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 07/24/2006 :  18:40:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,
You're absolutely right about the blue collar nature of the city. My father-in-law was a crane operator in the open hearth at Inland Steel. He had worked there for at least 25 years before his death in 1967. My father was a guard at Youngstown. Both were residents of Hessville. I might like to get back there just once to see what the place looks like now.


Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960
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j-g

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2006 :  23:18:28  Show Profile  Visit j-g's Homepage  Send j-g a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote

Hi Shep fans. Thanks for sharing and discussing ... I get a kick out threads like this.
I live in Hammond now, with a "TIlden" prefix phone number. I grew up in The Harbor, with an "EXport" prefix telephone number. I watch the ACS marathon on TNT on Christmas day, never tiring of explaining the local links to the ... fatheads viewing the movie. My college roommate used to live near the film location in Cleveland, to boot.

And yes, the new Harding school is up and running. Website at http://www.hammond.k12.in.us/HardingES/ ... but the pictures, or "tour" are not onlne yet.



ˇˇˇ Jess ˇˇˇ
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2006 :  23:34:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Welcome. I assume "The Harbor" = Indiana Harbor?

ANOTHER Harding School? The @#&%^#* barbarians better not have torn down the 1950s brick building I went to! It's bad enough that the wooden portable Shep went to is now just a grassy plot. And that they tore down my High School. And Goldblatt's.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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