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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 08/21/2007 :  07:20:57  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by golfwidow

Hi Tom, thanks for trying to help. We lived on 171st and Jefferson, near Edison School and Dairy Belle. We live in Crown Point now. We just drove through Hammond yesterday, my parents are visiting from Florida, and we took a trip dodwn memory lane, haha. We still can't remember the name of that grocery store. It was on the NW corner of 175th and Calumet . Thanks again.



Golfwidow:

Hey, I was just with a WHOLE BUNCH of Edison kids. Well, they were 58 year old "kids." We had our 40th class reunion for the Hammond High Class of 1967 a couple weeks ago, and many Edison School alumni were there.

I was talking to one of those Edison folks who attended the HHS reunion just yesterday, and I asked her about that grocery store. She remembers a Jewel store on the NW corner of 175th and Calumet. She said it may have been under some other name before or after it was a Jewel, but she said it was definitely a Jewel for a while.

Does that sound right to you?

Where did you go to high school? What was your graduation year?

I grew up six houses off of 165th St on Woodward Avenue, which is two blocks east of Calumet. I went to Wallace, Washington, then HHS.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Edited by - Tom J on 08/21/2007 07:23:08
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golfwidow

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 08/24/2007 :  13:25:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom, you'll probably say I'm a youngster, I graduated Gavit in 89. We had to get "special" permission for my sister and me to attend Gavit instead of HHS, because the cut off boundary then was Calumet Ave. My dad taught at Griffith Junior High and he drove right by Gavit on his way to work, so for convenience we went to Gavit. My brother went to Tech. He graduated in 79 or 80, I believe.
Thanks for the info on the grocery store. I don't remember it being a Jewel, but I'll pass it on to my parents and see if that jogs anyones memory.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 08/24/2007 :  14:31:46  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by golfwidow

Tom, you'll probably say I'm a youngster, I graduated Gavit in 89. We had to get "special" permission for my sister and me to attend Gavit instead of HHS, because the cut off boundary then was Calumet Ave. My dad taught at Griffith Junior High and he drove right by Gavit on his way to work, so for convenience we went to Gavit. My brother went to Tech. He graduated in 79 or 80, I believe.
Thanks for the info on the grocery store. I don't remember it being a Jewel, but I'll pass it on to my parents and see if that jogs anyones memory.



Golfwidow:

Graduated in 1989! I KNEW I could smell milk on your breath! :)

I guess that means you were born in 1971? Man, I was graduated from Purdue the year that you were born.

Your parents are probably not much older than I, right? They might not be ANY older than I, for that matter. Tell them to come to this forum and reminisce with me about the Hammond of the 1960s.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Edited by - Tom J on 08/25/2007 11:25:41
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golfwidow

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2007 :  11:00:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My dad graduated BNI (then Catholic Central) in 50, he grew up in North Hammond (Hickory St) went to Irving Elem. and my mom graduated Hirsch High (Chicago) in 56 (?), they are 75 and 70 yrs old. I'll have to see if my dad will want to check this website out. He's the one to sit at the computer, not my mom.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2007 :  11:33:55  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by golfwidow

My dad graduated BNI (then Catholic Central) in 50, he grew up in North Hammond (Hickory St) went to Irving Elem. and my mom graduated Hirsch High (Chicago) in 56 (?), they are 75 and 70 yrs old. I'll have to see if my dad will want to check this website out. He's the one to sit at the computer, not my mom.



OK, your folks are several years older than I. I'm 58 years old.

Hey, it's great if your dad is computer-savvy. There are lots of people of my age who never got into computers, so if a 75 year old knows how to use one, that's fantastic.

Tom


A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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dagwood

2 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2007 :  13:29:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pro2am

Lynn,

AFAIK the building that housed Carney's is still there (NW corner of Orchard Drive & Grand); I don't know what business currently occupies it.

Scott school is on the NE corner of 173rd & Grand, a ways north of Carney's across the NS ex-NKP railroad tracks. The other three corners of this intersection have houses (and always have).

I don't recall what used to be east of Carney's (across Grand) but there's an apartment complex there now. South of it (across Orchard Drive) is - or at least used to be - a little league baseball field and Orchard Drive elementary school - which I belive was recently torn down. :)

Mike R.

-----------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by lynndesert

Mike, thanks for the update. Had no idea there is a school at that corner. Funny, I had to pass that corner almost every day and couldn't remember was what across the street from Carney's. What's on the corner where Carney's used to be?
Lynn



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dagwood

2 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2007 :  13:31:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I went to scholl at OLPH and sat with carl carney, broach and chamberlain for years carl was a great guy and last I saw him he was investigating some rough stuff at the kenwood tap. anyone know where he is
quote:
Originally posted by dagwood

quote:
Originally posted by Pro2am

Lynn,

AFAIK the building that housed Carney's is still there (NW corner of Orchard Drive & Grand); I don't know what business currently occupies it.

Scott school is on the NE corner of 173rd & Grand, a ways north of Carney's across the NS ex-NKP railroad tracks. The other three corners of this intersection have houses (and always have).

I don't recall what used to be east of Carney's (across Grand) but there's an apartment complex there now. South of it (across Orchard Drive) is - or at least used to be - a little league baseball field and Orchard Drive elementary school - which I belive was recently torn down. :)

Mike R.

-----------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by lynndesert

Mike, thanks for the update. Had no idea there is a school at that corner. Funny, I had to pass that corner almost every day and couldn't remember was what across the street from Carney's. What's on the corner where Carney's used to be?
Lynn





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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 09/04/2007 :  16:24:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Dag and Welcome!
Carney's is now a pizza joint.

I don't know what he is up to now, but last time I saw him he was on the Hammond Police force and he had a gun draw while running for some building on Indianapolis Blvd. I could see it was no time for chit-chat so I continued on my way. Are you in the area or moved elsewhere?
Cj

Edited by - seejay2 on 09/04/2007 16:25:10
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 09/04/2007 :  19:43:53  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
You can see that Carney's building when it was just a hole in the groudnd if you get a copy of the Mid-American Heritage Preservation Society's video called "Hammond in the 1960s."

Mid-American Heritage Preservation Society (MAHP) accepts home video footage and digitalizes it to preserve it. They make compilation DVDs and VCRs for sale to the public, so if you want to see some scenes of Hammond from those glorious days of the 1960s, get yourself a copy of one of those DVDs or VCRs.

You can contact Anthony Diaz of MAHP at 219-933-1123. Anthony works shift work at a steel mill, so you may have to leave a message.

We really ought to support the work of MAHP, because as their name implies, they are really preserving our heritage.

Tom



A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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charlieslou

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2007 :  22:11:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi everyone. I haven't posted in a while and simply wanted to say hello from central PA.
Tod
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 09/30/2007 :  18:49:39  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Welcome back.
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 10/19/2007 :  15:31:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ok, it seems like everyone likes to reminisce. Here’s another category that I haven’t seen yet.

How about those fun little jobs at Warren G Harding that probably weren’t quite important enough to include on our résumés.

1) Rug monitor in kindergarten - Responsible for pulling rugs from the cabinet and getting them to the right classmates before morning or afternoon naptime. Then making sure they were rolled properly and returned to their correct places for the next day.

2) Milk delivery – Responsible for selecting helpers, collecting the attendance sheets from each class for a correct count, receiving milk from the milkman, loading the cartons into individual milk crates, loading the crates onto a pull cart, and then making deliveries to each classroom. Then later returning to collect the empty crates. I loved running through the hallways and pulling each other when returning the empty cart after delivery.

3) Erasure cleaning – The kids chosen by the teacher on Friday each week to take the blackboard erasures from the class room, taking the walk down the stairs to the basement, and finding your way through the dark tunnel to the electric erasure cleaning machine. I do remember it being quite noisy and running it for much longer than necessary.

4) Taking messages to the janitor in the boiler room – I distinctly remember wandering through the tunnel to the boiler room at least a half dozen times but don’t remember why. Probably needing help in adjusting the temperature in a room or letting him know there was an ‘accident’ that needed cleaning. I’m sure this is where I got my later interest for spelunking.

5) Patrol boys – The older students selected to assist other kids at intersections close to school. The training consisted of learning the proper arm waving to signal others stationed at least a block away that it was time to get to class and learning how to refold the white shoulder belts and attaching them to your belt. Wearing a belt through the day was somewhat of an honor. I remember this being a very desirable job since we stayed at the corners for another 5 minutes after school had started and it would take another 5 minutes to get to class. Were there any patrol "girls" ?

Too bad none of our kids and grandkids ever had the opportunity for this much fun.

Note: we are all adults now, so please do not feel badly if you didn’t get to participate in some of these activities. And, yes, please add your own stories as they come to mind. I’ll handle the disappointment as best I can!




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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 10/21/2007 :  13:33:23  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
BATHROOM MONITOR

I WAS one for the girl's bathroom in Miss Blount's room. HORROR I reported a fight between two sixth grade girls to Miss Blount. I was threatened by the two participants. Yikes I didn't want to do that one again. Fortunately, they went North and I scooted South after school. I never assigned that duty to any of my own students. It was too scary!

LIBRARY AIDE Responsible for checking in/out the library books. Read the shelves for accuracy of the alphabetizing of the books in the fiction section and by numbers and alphabet in the non-fiction section. I received an almanac for the duties performed from Miss Allemon.

Now this stood in good stead. I was Librarian for three years, Also I was the Safety Patrol Advisor for one of my scools. We would go to the Tigers' games yearly. My best captain was the son of a don in the mafia. They were all on duty from 8 am and left at 4pm. They were the BEST ever.

Teahing was a wonderful charge. One of my classes is having a 30 year reunion from HS and also meeting with me, their 6th grade teacher, for a reunion of their Elementary class.


Edited by - svea3 on 10/21/2007 14:46:35
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 10/21/2007 :  19:55:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
BATHROOM and HALL MONITORS are entry level NARCS, Linda. You gotta prepare for a life of looking over your shoulder when you enter into that cloak-and-dagger lifestyle....Cj

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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2007 :  12:15:26  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
SEEJAY
I know sometimes I think this role is a part of "womens" genes. No boy would EVER participate on such subterfuge (LL from Mr Ruff).

I hate it when I live up to my stereotype
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2007 :  11:52:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ya wanna bet? My first half-hour in Morton resulted in a male hall monitor hammering me for wandering around in the hall without a pass. I'm certain that guys like that went on to become MPs in Viet Nam..........Cj
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2007 :  16:56:46  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
OK You are right.

You know that cops are suppose to have a nice I Q-105. They probably indeed got their training as hall or bathroom monitors,for sure.

Edited by - svea3 on 11/22/2007 14:42:45
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2007 :  14:02:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Are you talking one guy or the whole unit in aggregate with 105? Cj
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2007 :  14:49:57  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Their totality/ sum of might be 105
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2007 :  16:59:04  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Now that I am laughing about the nature of our topic which started with my ilk of bathroom monitors, I mean no offense to anyone. In our state,the troopers/police are in the same retirement category of teachers!
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2007 :  03:54:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Viaduct Shep mentions in connection with the great "Banana Oil spill" must certainly have been the Indianapolis Blvd. Viaduct (completed 1937), over the Indiana Harbor Belt railroad yard (for link to photo, see below). Though it's not clear to me why his car would need to go over the Viaduct, on the way home from Hammond High School. Which intersection? Sounds like Michigan Street, at the north end of the Viaduct. Shep mentions the "Griselli Chemical Company" (Stauffer Chemical Company stood on the southeast corner, in the '50s and '60s) and Standard Oil (whose refinery/tank farm was also there, just east of the chemical company). Stauffer Chemical did indeed have huge piles of sulfur, out in the open (for the manufacture of sulfuric acid) -- though in my day, surrounded by such high fences that I'm sure no kid could ever get in to sled on them.

"3 1/2 miles to home"? Not so. Poetic license. Just 2 miles. I walked there from home frequently, on my way to the South Shore RR station just north of the Viaduct.

=====

See my post on page 4 of this thread:

"Here's a nice photo taken in the '50s from the big Indianapolis Blvd. Viaduct (built 1937), looking roughly northeast, and showing just the eastern half of the IHB freight yard:

http://www.hammondindiana.com/20thcentury/time_capsule06.htm

The low white structures on the far horizon are the Shell Oil Co. tank farm, along the (flammable) Calumet River. In that general direction, about 3 miles away, lie the steel mills. My neighborhood, and Shep's several blocks further away, would be off the photo, near the top right corner."

=====
Possible correction: I just checked my Hammond industries map. I'm not sure whether Shep says Standard Oil or Shell Oil. But in the 1960s, the refinery/tank farms both south of Michigan Ave. (i.e. just to the east of the chemical co.) and north of Michigan Ave. (i.e. along the shore of the Grand Calumet River) are marked "Shell Petroleum Corp."
=====

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63



Edited by - Bill Bucko on 12/17/2007 04:12:00
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Dave

USA
30 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2007 :  14:38:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There is/was a GRASSELLI chemical plant in EC, I know not where. It was a big NE IN employer during the Depression. Grasselli was later taken over by DuPont.

"Viaduct", to me, means a road that goes UNDER a railroad. A bridge goes over.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2007 :  16:38:28  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Dave[/i]
[br]There is/was a GRASSELLI chemical plant in EC, I know not where. It was a big NE IN employer during the Depression. Grasselli was later taken over by DuPont.

"Viaduct", to me, means a road that goes UNDER a railroad. A bridge goes over.



I thought it was the means by which the hot air from the furnace was distributed throughout the house. :)

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2007 :  22:34:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[quote][i]Originally posted by Dave[/i]
[br]There is/was a GRASSELLI chemical plant in EC, I know not where. It was a big NE IN employer during the Depression. Grasselli was later taken over by DuPont.

Grasselli was one of the first industries in the East Chicago area, begun in the late 1890's. My grandfather worked there. Sometime, likely in the 1940s or 50's (I'm guessing) it became DuPont de Neumors, and most recently I believe it was acquired by Grace company and still exists at the same site. It is located on Kennedy Avenue, just north of E. Michigan Street and along the north side of the Grand Calumet River. Just to the west, on the other side of Kennedy Ave, was US LEAD reduction company. US Lead has been gone for at least a decade or more, and the area is fenced off and covered over with soil because it is contaminated. A site that has some history about this area is located at the following link. You've got to scroll down to find the relevant information. http://www.lrc.usace.army.mil/E-Chicago/section3.pdf

An here is the definition of viaduct, which describes EXACTLY the bridge on Indianapolis Boulevard over the harbor belt tracks.

viaduct ( ) n. A series of spans or arches used to carry a road or railroad over a wide valley or over other roads or railroads.
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2007 :  22:49:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Link to some photos of Indy Blvd Viaduct itself and when under construction. http://www.hammondindiana.com/20thcentury/time_capsule52.htm
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2007 :  04:21:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For those who haven't seen it, here's a LARGE, DETAILED map of Hammond & East Chicago industries, issued by the Hammond School Board in 1964:

http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w292/billbucko/Hammondmap-industries.jpg

The original is 1805 x 3146 pixels; but Photobucket is probably going to condense its size. If you'd like a copy of the original, just e-mail me.

===
Yes, Photobucket did reduce it to roughly 1/3 size. You MUST see the original, if seriously interested.


Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63

Edited by - Bill Bucko on 12/18/2007 04:33:05
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2007 :  20:31:32  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
AH Wunderbar 24 hours has begun

The fellow mentioned IN sticking his tongue to the RR track was "Cotton Reichardt" ,my Dad's cousin. WOW I am recording it again as IF I won't see it again in the next 24 hours!

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL

Linda
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2007 :  10:27:02  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote


According to Mr Ruff 'THE Latin Teacher' at Morton...

VIA = road (noun)
DUCT = carry ( verb)
It is still Christmas! Merry to all.

Linda
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2008 :  23:27:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mr. Ruff would be proud of you !!

From Wikipedia, (my source of all knowledge)

A viaduct is a bridge composed of several small spans. The term viaduct is derived from the Latin via for road and duco to lead something. However, the Ancient Romans did not use that term per se; it is a modern derivation from an analogy with aqueduct. Like the Roman aqueducts, many early viaducts comprised a series of arches of roughly equal length. Viaducts may span land or water.

Where was the internet and Wikipedia when I had to do research using the 26 volumes of the Encyclopedia Britannica with 10 annual supplements?
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2008 :  18:10:31  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, Peeps, it has been nearly a month and a half since anyone has posted on this thread. This may not be of any interest to anyone here, but at least it IS a post.

I wrote this little essay about my dad a short time ago, and I thought I would share it with my buddies here.

Tom

My Reliable Dad

My dad, Paul Johnson, died on September 27, 1994, as a result of bone cancer. He was seventy-nine years old at the time of his death, but the last two years of Dad's life could hardly be called living. He deserved so much better!

Dad lost his left arm due to an accidental discharge of his shotgun when he was only sixteen. It was 40 miles to the nearest hospital from Dad’s home in rural western Kentucky back in those days, and he nearly bled to death before family members could get him there. The doctors amputated what little was left of Dad's arm, and he was left with just a stub that ended a few inches below his shoulder.

I cannot imagine how devastating this must have been for him. A young man of sixteen would be very conscious of his appearance, and he must have wondered how people would react to his missing arm, especially the girls. Of course, he would have to learn how to do with one hand the things he had always done with two.

Dad was simply amazing in the way he adapted to having only one arm. He could tie his shoes and neckties, and he could tie fishing knots. I'm not aware of anything that a person would normally need to do that Dad could not do. He never used a prosthetic arm; he just learned to use his one hand to do the things he needed to do.

He must have had his moments of anguish, especially when he was young, but I never even once got the impression that Dad felt sorry for himself. His lack of a left arm was a non-issue in his role as my dad, and I almost decided it was not even worth mentioning in my recollections about him.

In the final analysis, I decided that while he made no big deal of it, it truly was an amazing thing the way Dad overcame his handicap so completely that it was really no handicap at all. I think this speaks volumes about his character, and so I have included it.

In describing my dad to someone, there are many terms that I would have to use: Dad was honest, friendly, unassuming, hard-working, devoted, and faithful. The first word to come to mind, though, would be "reliable."

Reliability is, in my book, one of the greatest character traits. It is a trait that is not ascribed to a person until he has proven over time that he deserves it. In this ever-changing world, we need people in our lives on whom we know that we can depend. My dad was such a person. My mom and I were always able to rely on Dad, and he never let us down; he was our rock.

Dad was totally dedicated to his family, and he worked hard to provide for us. He worked a regular job as the superintendent of the parking facilities for the Edward C. Minas Company, a large department store that until its closing in 1984 was one of the anchor businesses of the downtown area of Hammond, Indiana, my hometown. Dad was responsible for the daily operation and maintenance of the outdoor parking lot and the four story parking garage that were owned by the store.

The Minas Company relied on Dad to keep the store's parking facilities looking good and functioning efficiently. It was important to the store that the customers found the parking to be easy and convenient and the parking attendants to be polite and friendly; the parking facilities were where customers formed their first and their last impressions of the Edward C. Minas Company on each of their visits. Dad was well aware of this and accepted it as a personal challenge to make the parking experience as pleasant as he possibly could for the Minas customers.

Dad's regular job led to his starting his own business. Part of his job in maintaining the Minas parking facilities was to repaint the lines for the parking stalls periodically. He eventually bought the striping equipment from the Minas Company and went into business for himself, painting parking lots in Hammond and the surrounding communities. He named his business "City Parking Engineers" and later changed it to "Tru-Line Striping Company." The Edward C. Minas Company, his employer, became his first customer.

The business grew by leaps and bounds, and Dad soon found that he didn't have to spend a lot of time recruiting new customers; they were contacting him on their own to obtain his services. Dad would always show up to paint at the time he had promised the customer that he would, unless the weather prevented it.

If the parking lot was new or had just been re-surfaced and there was no blueprint for the parking layout, Dad would apply his skills in designing the optimum parking scheme, so that the maximum number of cars could be accommodated, while at the same time providing easy parking that did not require tricky maneuvering on the part of the store's customers. He knew when to use straight-in parking, when to use angle parking, and how wide to make the driveways for either type. Dad understood that the parking must be easy in order to keep the store's customers coming back.

As far as the actual painting, Dad always did a good job, making the lines straight and even and putting down a uniform and generous coat of good quality paint, with no fuzzy edges on the lines. Parking lots looked great when Dad was finished with his work. His reputation for reliable work led to all the business he could handle. There's that word again, "reliable."

Dad's employer, the Edward C. Minas Company, found him to be reliable, his customers in his painting business found him to be reliable, and his family, my mom and I, found him to be reliable.

My dad made tremendous sacrifices for Mom and me, but he went about it in such a quiet, matter-of-fact way that it did not appear that he was doing anything special. I suppose in Dad's mind he wasn't doing anything special, just supporting his family. It never occurred to him to do less than his best to support us.

Dad loved to hunt and fish, but instead of heading for the fields or the lakes when he got up before daylight on the days when the downtown stores were open until 9:00 PM, the days when he didn't have to report to his regular job until noon, he headed for some parking lot that needed painting and was ready to begin working when the sun came up.

I helped Dad with many of the parking lots that he painted when I wasn't in school, but he was always good about getting someone else to help him, if I had something that I wanted to do. Even though he was doing it all for me, he paid me for my time, and the money was mine to spend as I saw fit.

Despite all the long hours that Dad worked, he still took time once in a while to take me hunting or fishing. We sometimes camped beside the Kankakee River on weekends and fished using set lines baited with large minnows. We would set up camp, then get in the boat and go upriver to set out the lines and bait the hooks. Every two hours or so we would go check our lines, harvest our catch, and re-bait the hooks. I cherish the memories of those trips.

I remember working crossword puzzles with Dad. He loved those things, and The Hammond Times, our local newspaper, had one every day. When I became old enough to help him, it was something that we did together after supper, or on Sunday afternoons, when we would work the extra big crossword puzzle that was always included in the Sunday paper.

I would sit on the arm of his chair, or sit beside him on the couch, and would look over his shoulder. Whenever I figured out a word, I would tell him where it was, and he would pencil it in. Looking back on the times that we did this when I was still very young, I'm sure that he purposely left some words that he knew blank, so that I could figure them out.

As I sat there looking over Dad's shoulder while we worked the crossword puzzles in the evening, I could smell a pleasant, distinctive odor emanating from him. It was not the artificial smell of deodorant or after shave, although Dad used both, but it was a natural, manly smell, one component of which, I'm sure, was the faint smell of perspiration.

Mom, Dad, and I watched certain TV shows each week as a family. I have especially fond memories of our family viewings of Gunsmoke, Bonanza, and The Wonderful World of Disney. I remember how Dad would make a big deal over Miss Kitty while we watched Gunsmoke, and I think he was just doing it to get a reaction out of Mom, which he usually did.

I am very proud that this man whom the Edward C. Minas company, the customers of Tru-Line Striping Company, and Mom and I relied upon was my dad. He never once let any of us down.

Mom relied upon Dad to be faithful to her, and he was. We both relied upon Dad to be the family breadwinner, and because he worked two jobs, Mom was able to stay home and be a full time mother to me.

God also relied upon Dad; He relied upon Dad to take me to church every Sunday, and Dad was faithful in this matter. As a result, I came to know Jesus as my Savior when I was eleven years old. Of all the wonderful things that my dad did for me, his taking me to church every Sunday was the most important; it was Dad's greatest gift to me.

I cannot remember even one occasion when Dad told me that he loved me, but neither can I remember ever doubting for a moment that he did. Dad preferred to show me that he loved me, rather than to tell me that he loved me. I miss my dad very much.



A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2008 :  12:06:30  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
svea3
quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

Well, Peeps, it has been nearly a month and a half since anyone has posted on this thread. This may not be of any interest to anyone here, but at least it IS a post.

I wrote this little essay about my dad a short time ago, and I thought I would share it with my buddies here.

Tom

My Reliable Dad

My dad, Paul Johnson, died on September 27, 1994, as a result of bone cancer. He was seventy-nine years old at the time of his death, but the last two years of Dad's life could hardly be called living. He deserved so much better!

Dad lost his left arm due to an accidental discharge of his shotgun when he was only sixteen. It was 40 miles to the nearest hospital from Dad’s home in rural western Kentucky back in those days, and he nearly bled to death before family members could get him there. The doctors amputated what little was left of Dad's arm, and he was left with just a stub that ended a few inches below his shoulder.

I cannot imagine how devastating this must have been for him. A young man of sixteen would be very conscious of his appearance, and he must have wondered how people would react to his missing arm, especially the girls. Of course, he would have to learn how to do with one hand the things he had always done with two.

Dad was simply amazing in the way he adapted to having only one arm. He could tie his shoes and neckties, and he could tie fishing knots. I'm not aware of anything that a person would normally need to do that Dad could not do. He never used a prosthetic arm; he just learned to use his one hand to do the things he needed to do.

He must have had his moments of anguish, especially when he was young, but I never even once got the impression that Dad felt sorry for himself. His lack of a left arm was a non-issue in his role as my dad, and I almost decided it was not even worth mentioning in my recollections about him.

In the final analysis, I decided that while he made no big deal of it, it truly was an amazing thing the way Dad overcame his handicap so completely that it was really no handicap at all. I think this speaks volumes about his character, and so I have included it.

In describing my dad to someone, there are many terms that I would have to use: Dad was honest, friendly, unassuming, hard-working, devoted, and faithful. The first word to come to mind, though, would be "reliable."

Reliability is, in my book, one of the greatest character traits. It is a trait that is not ascribed to a person until he has proven over time that he deserves it. In this ever-changing world, we need people in our lives on whom we know that we can depend. My dad was such a person. My mom and I were always able to rely on Dad, and he never let us down; he was our rock.

Dad was totally dedicated to his family, and he worked hard to provide for us. He worked a regular job as the superintendent of the parking facilities for the Edward C. Minas Company, a large department store that until its closing in 1984 was one of the anchor businesses of the downtown area of Hammond, Indiana, my hometown. Dad was responsible for the daily operation and maintenance of the outdoor parking lot and the four story parking garage that were owned by the store.

The Minas Company relied on Dad to keep the store's parking facilities looking good and functioning efficiently. It was important to the store that the customers found the parking to be easy and convenient and the parking attendants to be polite and friendly; the parking facilities were where customers formed their first and their last impressions of the Edward C. Minas Company on each of their visits. Dad was well aware of this and accepted it as a personal challenge to make the parking experience as pleasant as he possibly could for the Minas customers.

Dad's regular job led to his starting his own business. Part of his job in maintaining the Minas parking facilities was to repaint the lines for the parking stalls periodically. He eventually bought the striping equipment from the Minas Company and went into business for himself, painting parking lots in Hammond and the surrounding communities. He named his business "City Parking Engineers" and later changed it to "Tru-Line Striping Company." The Edward C. Minas Company, his employer, became his first customer.

The business grew by leaps and bounds, and Dad soon found that he didn't have to spend a lot of time recruiting new customers; they were contacting him on their own to obtain his services. Dad would always show up to paint at the time he had promised the customer that he would, unless the weather prevented it.

If the parking lot was new or had just been re-surfaced and there was no blueprint for the parking layout, Dad would apply his skills in designing the optimum parking scheme, so that the maximum number of cars could be accommodated, while at the same time providing easy parking that did not require tricky maneuvering on the part of the store's customers. He knew when to use straight-in parking, when to use angle parking, and how wide to make the driveways for either type. Dad understood that the parking must be easy in order to keep the store's customers coming back.

As far as the actual painting, Dad always did a good job, making the lines straight and even and putting down a uniform and generous coat of good quality paint, with no fuzzy edges on the lines. Parking lots looked great when Dad was finished with his work. His reputation for reliable work led to all the business he could handle. There's that word again, "reliable."

Dad's employer, the Edward C. Minas Company, found him to be reliable, his customers in his painting business found him to be reliable, and his family, my mom and I, found him to be reliable.

My dad made tremendous sacrifices for Mom and me, but he went about it in such a quiet, matter-of-fact way that it did not appear that he was doing anything special. I suppose in Dad's mind he wasn't doing anything special, just supporting his family. It never occurred to him to do less than his best to support us.

Dad loved to hunt and fish, but instead of heading for the fields or the lakes when he got up before daylight on the days when the downtown stores were open until 9:00 PM, the days when he didn't have to report to his regular job until noon, he headed for some parking lot that needed painting and was ready to begin working when the sun came up.

I helped Dad with many of the parking lots that he painted when I wasn't in school, but he was always good about getting someone else to help him, if I had something that I wanted to do. Even though he was doing it all for me, he paid me for my time, and the money was mine to spend as I saw fit.

Despite all the long hours that Dad worked, he still took time once in a while to take me hunting or fishing. We sometimes camped beside the Kankakee River on weekends and fished using set lines baited with large minnows. We would set up camp, then get in the boat and go upriver to set out the lines and bait the hooks. Every two hours or so we would go check our lines, harvest our catch, and re-bait the hooks. I cherish the memories of those trips.

I remember working crossword puzzles with Dad. He loved those things, and The Hammond Times, our local newspaper, had one every day. When I became old enough to help him, it was something that we did together after supper, or on Sunday afternoons, when we would work the extra big crossword puzzle that was always included in the Sunday paper.

I would sit on the arm of his chair, or sit beside him on the couch, and would look over his shoulder. Whenever I figured out a word, I would tell him where it was, and he would pencil it in. Looking back on the times that we did this when I was still very young, I'm sure that he purposely left some words that he knew blank, so that I could figure them out.

As I sat there looking over Dad's shoulder while we worked the crossword puzzles in the evening, I could smell a pleasant, distinctive odor emanating from him. It was not the artificial smell of deodorant or after shave, although Dad used both, but it was a natural, manly smell, one component of which, I'm sure, was the faint smell of perspiration.

Mom, Dad, and I watched certain TV shows each week as a family. I have especially fond memories of our family viewings of Gunsmoke, Bonanza, and The Wonderful World of Disney. I remember how Dad would make a big deal over Miss Kitty while we watched Gunsmoke, and I think he was just doing it to get a reaction out of Mom, which he usually did.

I am very proud that this man whom the Edward C. Minas company, the customers of Tru-Line Striping Company, and Mom and I relied upon was my dad. He never once let any of us down.

Mom relied upon Dad to be faithful to her, and he was. We both relied upon Dad to be the family breadwinner, and because he worked two jobs, Mom was able to stay home and be a full time mother to me.

God also relied upon Dad; He relied upon Dad to take me to church every Sunday, and Dad was faithful in this matter. As a result, I came to know Jesus as my Savior when I was eleven years old. Of all the wonderful things that my dad did for me, his taking me to church every Sunday was the most important; it was Dad's greatest gift to me.

I cannot remember even one occasion when Dad told me that he loved me, but neither can I remember ever doubting for a moment that he did. Dad preferred to show me that he loved me, rather than to tell me that he loved me. I miss my dad very much.



A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!



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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2008 :  12:09:45  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote

Your essay is oh so inspirational.

Your dad is and was the backbone of the good ole USA.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2008 :  19:25:32  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Linda.

It's sad that we so often don't fully appreciate someone until after they are gone. I would spend a lot more time with my dad, if I could somehow go back and relive the last years that he was still here.

I wish we could get some posting going in here again!

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 02/29/2008 :  07:50:25  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Will somebody please post, for Pete's sake?

We had a good thing going here. What happened?

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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cartoonguy

USA
73 Posts

Posted - 02/29/2008 :  20:41:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Alright, alright, I’m posting, I’m posting, in fact this is my first time, please be gentle. Greetings all, my name is Bill, and I was born in and raised in Hammond, I went to Woodrow Wilson Elementary, and was a student at both Gavit and Morton High, graduated in 1978. I left Hammond in 1992, lived in Chicago until 1996; I now reside in California, and work in the Animation Industry. Some of my fondest memories were working as an usher at the Paramount Theatre, Hammond at Christmas time, watching Creature Features on Saturday nights, the snow storm of 1967, the blizzard of 1979, and many more.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2008 :  07:47:04  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Welcome, Cartoonguy! Thanks for breaking the ice and making your first post.

I hope some new blood in here will stimulate some posting.

That's cool that you were an usher at the Paramount. I saw a few flicks there "back in the day."

I'm a 1967 HHS grad, so it appears that I am eleven years your senior. That makes us close enough in age to remember a lot of the same things about Hammond.

I share your fond memories of downtown Hammond in the Christmas season. My dad worked at Minas's, and I worked there part time once in a while. I loved downtown Hammond year round, but especially at Christmas time.

Have you been back to Hammond since 1996? Downtown is a very sad place now. There is no retailing at all, except for good old Muehler's Hardware. This Minas store is gone, and in its place is a huge auditorium for First Baptist Church.

How long have you been "lurking?" Have you read all the posts in here? Please check them out and make your own comments. Don't be afraid to bring up subjects that have already been discussed. We would love to hear your thoughts on them.

Once again, welcome!

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2008 :  11:56:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Tom

Who is this Pete? (kidding!) I have been checking the site, just too lazy to log in I guess.

The 50th anniversary of my class at Morton is to take place this August and I am looking forward to getting reacquainted with people I knew and those for whom I have memories of knowing they existed in my high school world but did not really know.

BTW, did you avoid the tornadoes that did such damage on the night of Super Tuesday? I was lucky to have the tornadoes jump over. The devastation, though, of those south and north of me is heartbreaking to see.

Did you see or hear about the police allegedly beating up on a family in Hammond? i saw only a mention of it on a morning news program as I walked to the kitchen. Did that really happen?

As you can see, I don't have much to add to our memories at this time. I just wanted you to know I am watching and reading--Loved your memories of your father, Mr. Reliable. He was one of a generation who knew the value of sticking in and working hard.






Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2008 :  12:39:26  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

Hi Tom

Who is this Pete? (kidding!) I have been checking the site, just too lazy to log in I guess.

The 50th anniversary of my class at Morton is to take place this August and I am looking forward to getting reacquainted with people I knew and those for whom I have memories of knowing they existed in my high school world but did not really know.

BTW, did you avoid the tornadoes that did such damage on the night of Super Tuesday? I was lucky to have the tornadoes jump over. The devastation, though, of those south and north of me is heartbreaking to see.

Did you see or hear about the police allegedly beating up on a family in Hammond? i saw only a mention of it on a morning news program as I walked to the kitchen. Did that really happen?

As you can see, I don't have much to add to our memories at this time. I just wanted you to know I am watching and reading--Loved your memories of your father, Mr. Reliable. He was one of a generation who knew the value of sticking in and working hard.






Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!



Hi, S.C.!

Thanks for the kind words regarding my little essay about my dad. I thought maybe just about all of us in here could relate to a hard-working, devoted dad. The typical two parent families with stay at home moms that we grew up in are becoming rarities these days.

The tornado that passed through Greenville on February 5th completely destroyed homes just a hair over a mile from me. That was a close call! Three folks were killed in a trailer park just two miles from me.

Had not heard anything about the police beating anyone up in Hammond, please post more info as your learn more details.

Where do you live now, SC?

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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cartoonguy

USA
73 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2008 :  00:45:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[quote]Originally posted by Tom J

Have you been back to Hammond since 1996? Downtown is a very sad place now. There is no retailing at all, except for good old Muehler's Hardware. This Minas store is gone, and in its place is a huge auditorium for First Baptist Church.

“Sigh”, I’m afraid so. I was able to walk through the shell of what was left of Woodmar Shopping Center before they tore it down. About fifteen years ago a friend and I were shooting darts at LaRosa’s Restaurant, on Indianapolis Blvd, so we decided to make the game more interesting, the loser had to have their picture taken with Santa Clause at Woodmar , well, needles to say, I lost, now keep in mind here’s a man in his early thirties in line with all the kids to pose with Santa, my friend informed the female helpers(elves) of my losing the bet, so they all decided I needed to wear a red cap for my photo. Afterwards the whole bar got a big laugh at my expense, but that was okay, I myself found the whole thing pretty amusing.

I have been checking in to your forum for awhile, but been pretty busy to post, finally I am between projects, so happy to share some memories of growing up in Hammond.

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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2008 :  21:49:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Hi, S.C.!

Thanks for the kind words regarding my little essay about my dad. I thought maybe just about all of us in here could relate to a hard-working, devoted dad. The typical two parent families with stay at home moms that we grew up in are becoming rarities these days. Tom, my dad had the task of working and keeping me and my brothers together without a helpmate. What we had were our neighbors who were always there when we needed them.

The tornado that passed through Greenville on February 5th completely destroyed homes just a hair over a mile from me. That was a close call! Three folks were killed in a trailer park just two miles from me.

Had not heard anything about the police beating anyone up in Hammond, please post more info as your learn more details.I just saw/heard that one little bit on a morning news program. Guess we could check the NWI Times.

Where do you live now, SC? I live in Nashville.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


[/quote]

Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2008 :  07:47:32  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
SC:

Sorry that you did not have a mom at home. Sounds like the neighbors took good care of you kids while your dad worked.

I just thank God that I had both a mom and a dad as I was growing up. Those who, like me, were blessed with two parent homes should realize how fortunate we were.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2008 :  23:46:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK Tom and all the gang. I haven't seen this discussion yet. How many of you used to go to the Roller Dome on Saturdays? I remember going when I was about 13 or 14 and the big thrill was the "spotlight couples" dance, where boys would line up on one side and girls on another and one couple would start out and then switch when they put the spotlight on you. I also remember the organ music they would play. And for some reason, someone would also always play "Gimme Little sign, girl" on the Juke Box. Lots of fun times there on Saturday afternoons! Sometimes you'd meet the same girl 3 Saturdays in a row....were you going next week to see her, or was she going to see you?
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2008 :  00:31:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've only been to the Roller Dome once, spent most of the time on my butt. Never been a fan of roller skating. But I spent lots of time on the ice at "Lost Park"!

Harding Class of '67
Morton Class of '72
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2008 :  04:23:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WHY the heck did they call it "Lost Park"? And how far back did that name start?

Anyone know??

My first visit was probably around 1953 or '54, and we called it "Lost Park" then.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2008 :  07:22:16  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I can't remember ever going there, but I might have gone a time or two. Where was the place? The name "Roller Dome" sure rings a bell with me. Was it in north Hammond?

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2008 :  04:50:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
On the maps, officially, it's called Gibson Park.

One block east of Shep's house, and a couple of blocks north.

Why does he never mention it??

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2008 :  12:47:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I may have gone to the Roller Dome once. The interesting thing to me is that the woman who inherited the Roller Dome in the 1990's was living here in Nashville and I had met her in Glorieta, NM in the late 1970's. SMALL WORLD? She had, maybe still has, a home in my neighborhood--one block from me. At that time there was a lawsuit because of step siblings or stepmother (evil? I don't know) contending for property--so does the Roller Dome still exist? last I knew the woman was fighting the lawsuit while running the place.

quote:
Originally posted by duane

OK Tom and all the gang. I haven't seen this discussion yet. How many of you used to go to the Roller Dome on Saturdays? I remember going when I was about 13 or 14 and the big thrill was the "spotlight couples" dance, where boys would line up on one side and girls on another and one couple would start out and then switch when they put the spotlight on you. I also remember the organ music they would play. And for some reason, someone would also always play "Gimme Little sign, girl" on the Juke Box. Lots of fun times there on Saturday afternoons! Sometimes you'd meet the same girl 3 Saturdays in a row....were you going next week to see her, or was she going to see you?



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2008 :  18:10:11  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Can someone please tell me where the Roller Dome was (is) located?

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2008 :  19:48:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[quote]Originally posted by Tom J

Can someone please tell me where the Roller Dome was (is) located?

730 E Gostlin St
Hammond, IN
is what Google shows--along with a map. I just googled "Roller Dome Hammond, IN" and that came up first on the list.


Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

Edited by - S C Jones on 03/07/2008 19:49:25
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2008 :  21:17:28  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

[quote]Originally posted by Tom J

Can someone please tell me where the Roller Dome was (is) located?

730 E Gostlin St
Hammond, IN
is what Google shows--along with a map. I just googled "Roller Dome Hammond, IN" and that came up first on the list.


Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!



Well, I guess it's still there then? I was thinking it was in North Hammond, and I guess Gostlin would be sort of "north."

Thanks.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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