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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2007 :  14:25:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[quote]Originally posted by svea3

Sue Sharkey's BB team. I was a forward,but it was Sue that had the most baskets on our winning team!
-----------
Linda,
Okay, I guess I have to confess--while I was a forward, Judy Hellinga was the star of the team. I was the scrapper and got the ball to her. I was 5' and she was probably 5'6' or more?

The only shot I remember making (because it was probably the only one I made) was when we played the teachers. It got a lot of noise from the crowd, because--who ever thought I could at my height make a net-only basket over a teacher?





Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

Edited by - S C Jones on 04/24/2007 14:26:32
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2007 :  14:30:22  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
WHAT WAS OUR GYM TEACHER'S name,anyway? She was tall! She turned up with me at the University of Michigan as a golf teacher that I had to take to get my Master's.
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2007 :  15:19:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Miss Shure? Something like that. Wore glasses? There was another gym teacher before I graduated--in fact, maybe 2. I do not remember their names

quote:
Originally posted by svea3

WHAT WAS OUR GYM TEACHER'S name,anyway? She was tall! She turned up with me at the University of Michigan as a golf teacher that I had to take to get my Master's.



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

Edited by - S C Jones on 04/24/2007 15:29:05
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2007 :  15:24:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's Glogg. Not glug, glogg with two dots over the "o".
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2007 :  16:26:11  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
That's the Brit's for ya. MY DAD USED TO MAKE IT AN ENORMOUS POT EVERY CHRISTMAS !

Here's a recipe from the internet.

Glug Cocktail


8 ounces water
1 cup raisins
3 cinnamon sticks
5 whole cloves
12 cardamom seeds
2 dry orange peels
Boil ingredients for 10 minutes in saucepan, then add:

1 gallon port wine
One 750-ml. bottle brandy
16 ounces rum
1/2 cup sugar
Bring to boil and let simmer 1 minute, then turn off burner and ignite. Allow the mixture to burn for about 15 seconds. Serve hot
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2007 :  16:34:46  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
THE Brit's are ANGLO- SAXONS. Now my German relatives are Saxon and they are the ones who lived in HESSville. The only Hessians I knew were the George Hess family

It was Miss Shurr. She was nice. I got A's at Morton and UM

Edited by - svea3 on 04/24/2007 17:08:02
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2007 :  08:13:23  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Did you ever calculate how many SINGLE female teachers we had? Also, how great MrHayes was becase he had a small child? As I was straightening my genealogy files I just found another class pix. Marge Van Til is there. Seeings I am working on an "Apple" I will have my son send it to you later Ken. [It involvesPhotoShop, I think]

Edited by - svea3 on 04/25/2007 08:14:09
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2007 :  14:09:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by svea3

Did you ever calculate how many SINGLE female teachers we had? Also, how great MrHayes was becase he had a small child?



I get some of the jr hi and high school teachers confused--Miss Lockhart (jr. hi. geography) Chidester (math) was it Mr. Anderson (business), Miss. Walker (jr. hi. history, who liked the boys and ignored the girls in her class?) Miss Coble (English), Miss Virdin? Mr. Harper (Biology). My memory is taxed beyond thinking.

That which I do know is that the teachers I had at OPMHS were (with one exception--a Mrs./Miss Miller who taught music in Jr. Hi. I think) were supportive of their students. I had so many helping hands extended to me in the form of quiet talks that did not threaten a scared little teen and I even got my first full time job because the teacher sent me to an interview with a co. that had requested a graduating student.



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2007 :  18:33:29  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
There were some 2nd generation Americans that I know of.
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  14:39:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does anyone remember a TasteeFreeze on Kennedy? I know there has been discussion re: Dairy Queen, and I remember that being on the West side of Kennedy and North of the Drug stores/Vierks/Ace Theater businesses. I remember a Tastee Freeze somewhere on Kennedy---
Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

Edited by - S C Jones on 04/26/2007 14:44:17
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lynndesert

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  17:24:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello everyone,
How nice to find this site and how wonderful it is to reminence about our home town. Growing up and living in Hessville in the 50’s and 60’s made the good ole’ days just that much more special for us. Went to OLPH and then to the old Morton before graduating in 1969 from Morton, second graduation class from the new school although I really missed the old one. Came from a big Polish family so some of you may know my cousins.
By the way, I’ve never known any ice cream place growing up other than DQ. Sorry I couldn’t help.
Lynn
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  17:40:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Lynn,
It's good to have another mighty Governor on board. I hope you have a pleasant experience shooting the breeze with those of us who grew up in Hessville and elsewhere. Can't say that I know anything about the "new" Morton High School, but I sure have a lot of good feelings about the old one at 7040 Marshall and about the rest of Hessville, at least all that I can remember. Enjoy.

Ken -- Morton High School 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 04/26/2007 17:41:50
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  17:45:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Welcome aboard, Lynn!
I myself blundered into this site sometime in January and haven't been able to pull myself from it since. I graduated Morton in 67. We were the last class to graduate from the old building. Never really gave it much thought until it was gone, then it's too late.
Who might your cousins be? It seems like everyone in that town was connected in some way, but just never knew it until they started reading this forum.
I'm like you, I grew up around the iconic Del's Dairy Queen,(the old man always refered to it as "frozen custard") but I really don't remember a Tastee Freeze. There was some ice cream joint in Highland we used to go to, but I don't remember the name of the place. It was on the east part of town on Highway Ave. I remember they had an orange sherbet that I liked........CJ
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lynndesert

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  21:17:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you for the welcome.

The new Morton was very disappointing to me after attending the old Morton. I graduated 8th grade from old Morton and was sorry they built the new one. Did not have the personality nor the history of the old one.

Cousins: well, hope you are not sorry you asked. Think they all went to Morton. We all had same grandma, different grandpas. We were direct descendants of the Sosnowski, which were located in Chicago area as well as Griffith and Schererville. These are the Hessville bunch.
Bud (Clarence) Murdock
Rosalie Murdock
Kenny Murdock
Harold Murdock
Pam Opperman
Mike Opperman
Tom Chess
Barbara Chess

Lynn-Morton graduate
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lynndesert

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  21:19:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ooops, forgot
Cookie (Clarence) Opperman
Raymond Opperman
Charley Opperman

Lynn
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eyebab

USA
12 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  21:31:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bud Murdock, probably about the class of '55 at Morton, was as good a player as anyone on the varsity basketball team, but who never bothered to try out for the team.

jerry babitz
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lynndesert

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  22:20:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's too bad, Jerry. Don't know if he was much of a team player. You must have been one of the few people that knew him with hair. He shaved it off at a young age and kept it shaved. I actually found a photo of him with hair. He was a real "outdoorsman" I guess.
Lynn
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  22:31:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all,

I thought this link might be interesting – The Hammond Historical Society. They maintain an on-line archive of their publication. There are 34 issues dating back to early 2002. I know that isn’t too far, but the history they contain should have a wide appeal.

http://www.hammondindiana.com/society_page.html

Of particular interest to me was the following article detailing our ‘beloved’ trains. I recall from another article back in time that Hammond was noted for the fact that the city had 365 miles of paved roads – and 365 miles of train tracks.

Trains Were Traffic Stoppers

Source information for this article obtained from the microfilms of The Times newspapers at the Hammond Public Library. Jan. ‘65

"Trains in Downtown Hammond stopped traffic one third of the day! Several traffic studies were conducted in the early to mid 1960's and they alluded to the fact that most of us already knew back then. Trains blocked the railroad crossings in downtown anywhere from 6˝ to 8 hours plus per day. A Douglas Street survey taken in early January of 1965 for one week, showed the heaviest volume of traffic occurred on Thursday when 5,915 vehicles crossed the tracks, with the crossing gates down a total of 8 hours and 4 minutes for an average of 20 minutes each hour. … A survey of Hohman Avenue was initiated in 1962 by the police department's traffic safety division. This was the city's most notorious railroad crossing where seven railroads crossed Hohman Avenue. Here the statistics revealed that the gates were lowered on average 198 times within a 24 hour period, or 1,386 times each week, or 5,940 times in a month. The average number of trains for a 24 hour period was 127, or 889 a week, or 3,810 in a month. The train's length averaged 57 cars, with the longest at 108 cars not including the engines. The average number of vehicles crossing the Hohman Avenue tracks in a 24 hour period from Monday to Friday was 15,753. The delays averaged 20 minutes and 41 seconds or 8 hours and 15 minutes for a 24 hour period."

We may not have known all the details, but we did know to leave 20 minutes early for any trip even near a track!

Edited by - Jim on 04/26/2007 23:04:48
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eyebab

USA
12 Posts

Posted - 04/26/2007 :  23:16:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Trains....now there's a memory of Hammond. Of course you got hung up no matter where you drove. There was nothing to do for entertainment but count the # of train cars. If you got into that game, then the longer the train the better. I can remember my ultimate goal was to count over a hundred cars, but I can't recall if I ever counted that many.

Of course, back then, you could identify the end of the train as it had a caboose. Front of the train or the back, usually someone was there to wave back at you.

Diesels came in around the mid-fifties I think, replacing the romantic coal burning steam engines. The first diesels had some horizontal white stripes and were nicknamed "zebras."

Indiana Harbor Belt had the big freight yard. I think they were a division of New York Central.

Thanks. Good topic.

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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  10:08:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh yes, the trains. I wish DEEDEE were here now because she could back me up on this one. Both of our fathers were engineers for IHB out of the Gibson yard, also refered to as the roundhouse. One thing I found out at a tender young age in the Johnson house was that you did not criticize the railroad for holding up traffic. The first thing you would hear was "This town was built around the railroad and yada...yada...yada". It didn't stop there. "The reason there is no crime in this town is because the criminals can't risk getting stopped be trains during the getaway and...yada...yada...yada" Oh please stop it! I've heard it so many times before!!!
But friends, there is a double standard here. They (the engineers)have a mantra: "You haven't had a good day until you've held up 80 blocks of traffic". This is the truth! Another thing: when you are sitting there what seems like eternity, DO NOT blow your horn. You will change the concept of eternity to extend beyond forever. Guaranteed.
One more thing. This is for you, EYEBAB. When someone waved at you from the train, whether it be from the front or back, this was their little way of giving you the finger.....CJ

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/27/2007 10:12:14
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  10:36:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Like you say, Jerry, the steam engines (hot water jobs) were romantic. Dad always hated the diesels and you could see that his love for the job faded when diesels entered the picture.
I still remember a few steam engines as a small child. I was going to OLPH at the time and we would have to cross the tracks at 165th by the cemetery. Back then, one of the most widely known facts of life (right up there with Santa Claus)was that if you stood too close to a rolling steam engine, you would get sucked into the wheels as it passed and you would instantly become wheel grease.
One of the rights of passage to becoming a man was to stand there, when we saw one coming, and put that notion to the test. I never made it. I would see that thing coming with all the racket it made, whistles, bells and that thick black smoke that belched up out of the stack was entirely too much for me. ZOOM! Gone!.......CJ
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lynndesert

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  10:41:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We counted the cars also and probably feel asleep doing so. It was a killer when those trains stopped or went back and forth. Does anyone know what it is like today?

Thanks for that link, Jim. That was totally awesome, and the issues of the Flaskback were great. I skimmed most of them but can hardly wait to read them this weekend. Too bad there wasn’t more info on Hessville but the articles, photos, and history was the best.

Lynn
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  12:24:54  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
You guys have taken this discussion to the subject of trains, and I LOVE trains, especially trains from the days of the steam locomotives.

I remember very well the steam locomotives from the summers I spent at my grandmother's house in Kentucky. The following is a little essay I wrote about my memories of summer nights at my grandmother's house. Her house was less than 100 feet from the railroad tracks.


Nights at Vick's Crossing

I don't know why I have been thinking so much lately about those magical summer nights in Kentucky, when I spent the summers with my grandmother, or as we called her, "Mammaw." They have sure been on my mind a lot.

We often affectionately referred to Mammaw's place as “Vick’s Crossing.” That was an unofficial name given to the place by some of the local folks, since at some point in time there had been a family of Vicks living nearby, and when the old highway was still in use, before the railroad overpass was built, there was a railroad crossing there; thus, “Vick’s Crossing.” To this very day, the mention of the term, “Vick’s Crossing,” brings a flood of memories to mind and almost brings tears to my eyes.

I recall those nights at Vick’s Crossing back in the summers of 1957, 1958, and 1959, and I wish the nights nowadays could be like those back then. In those three summers, I was 8, 9, and 10 years old.

Mammaw lived on a one-acre lot out in the country. There was a little country lane that made a ninety-degree left turn from west to south as one drove from the main highway, and it was in this corner that her acre of ground was situated.

We were a few miles away from anything that could be called a real town, the nearest one being Greenville, KY, which had a population of only about 5000. There were two little communities closer than Greenville, but they were each pretty much just a collection of a few homes and a little country store.

Being out in the country like that meant that when nighttime came, it got dark, very dark. There were no streetlights, and people in those days didn't feel the need for the security lights that are so common now. The darkness during those nights was intense, with the only light at all being provided by the stars and the moon, and, of course, by the fireflies, which we called "lightnin' bugs."

That darkness back then was much more than just "an absence of light;" it was a tangible presence. It could be felt. There was a substance to that darkness.

That black, velvety darkness enveloped and nurtured the little boy who lay there in his bed with the window opened wide, as he listened to the night sounds. He had no fear of that darkness; there was a comforting familiarity about it. He knew that all was well: the chirping of the crickets, the high-pitched croaking of the tree frogs, the lonely call of the whippoorwill, the random flashes of the fireflies, and the gentle stirring of the night breeze told him that everything in his world was as it should be.

A set of railroad tracks passed by the front of the house and was only a stone's throw from the front porch. They still ran steam locomotives in those days, and little Tommy somehow woke up each night at just the right time to hear the night train's steam whistle blowing at the railroad crossing in the little community of Depoy, a mile to the east. He would listen intently as the rumble of the train became louder and louder, until it reached a crescendo in front of the little house.

When the train was very close, its oscillating headlight would brighten the room when it swung in the direction of the house, then return the room to darkness when it swung the opposite direction. The room would alternately brighten and darken, until the engine was past the house.

The little boy loved lying there in his bed, watching the room brighten and darken over and over again. He felt the rythmic shaking of his bed as the ground trembled in the wake of the passing train. He could hear the window panes of the old house, loosened by the drying-out and shrinking of their caulking, rattling in their frames.

Once the locomotive was past the house, the clickity-clack of the railroad cars’ wheels passing over the joints in the rails replaced the sound of the engine. This sound would diminish as the train traveled beyond the range of his hearing, and the little boy would drift off once again to a peaceful sleep, with the train sounds gradually fading into silence.

How glorious and wonderful were those nights! I have never slept as peacefully and have never slept as soundly since those nights back then. I have never been so rejuvenated by a night’s sleep since those times
.




A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

Edited by - Tom J on 04/27/2007 14:44:01
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  13:41:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, so you like trains. I am not an expert on them by any means. But, having lived within 400 feet of the tracks near 165th I have many memories - some are even good ones.

I was doing a little digging and found a document that might interest all you IHB fans. This is a 34 page bulletin for operating the IHB in the Chicago area published in 2004. There are numerous diagrams of the track sections from our wonderful little town. Included are details on limitations on size, weight, speed, and clearances. Track sections and crossings are named as well as ownership of the various lines, length of sections, etc.

Happy reading !!!

http://www.ihbrr.com/bulletins/7412_IHB_alt5.pdf
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  13:45:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey CJ -- If you are getting to the Old Country any time soon, let me put in a request for another picture. Actually, I should have requested it last time when I asked for one of my childhood home. This is of my wife's parent's home from the 1940s until they died, her mother being the last in 1987. It is located on Kenwood Street, just around the corner and down the block from the original location of Cande's Pizza which was at 6310 Kennedy until about 1958. The house is 2712 Kenwood, the third one east of Alexander on the south side of the street. Thanks a bunch.

Tom -- Thanks for the train essay.

Ken -- Morton High School 1960
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  14:00:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lynn--You mentioned the Opperman name as your cousins. I clearly remember a Mike, drummer in the MHS band and other bands, but I came across this pic and I don't remember this guy at all. Is he part of yours, too..........Cj

Edited by - seejay2 on 04/27/2007 14:00:40
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  14:04:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey CJ,

If you are already on Kenwood Avenue, how about another photo just down the block at 2630 Kenwood. I would really appreciate that. The only time I have been there recently was after dark on a family trip returning from King Tut.

Thanks,
Jim
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  16:39:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken and Jim,
Not a problem. I see you guys are 'homies'
Here we go with this Cande's on Kennedy Ave again. I really wish I could remember when it was there. The only place I knew was on 165th & Arizona. One thing didn't change I'm sure and that was Dominic, the resident crust wrangler..........Cj
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johncmccann

USA
39 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  17:11:34  Show Profile  Visit johncmccann's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

Like you say, Jerry, the steam engines (hot water jobs) were romantic. I would see that thing coming with all the racket it made, whistles, bells and that thick black smoke that belched up out of the stack was entirely too much for me. ZOOM! Gone!.......CJ


I lived in Hessvile from 1947 until about 1962 and my Dad was a Dispatcher on the IHB/New York Central at the Gibson Yard. I remember when moving to Hessville in 47 the steam engines were close enough to us to rain soot on my mother's wash hanging on the line. I spent allot of time running through the woods between our house on the corner of California and Crane and the railroad tracks, I can remember clearing the cattails off of a section of the swamp to make an ice skating rink. I also remember going from the old Morton to home and getting stuck by the same train at about three crossings as they wove their way through town. My name is John McCann for any of you that might remember me.

John
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eyebab

USA
12 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  17:24:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John---Welcome to the board... Did you graduate from Morton? What year? Classmates? Appreciate your remenisces and any others you might have of Hessville to downtown Hammond.
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johncmccann

USA
39 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  18:50:46  Show Profile  Visit johncmccann's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by eyebab

John---Welcome to the board... Did you graduate from Morton? What year? Classmates? Appreciate your remenisces and any others you might have of Hessville to downtown Hammond.


I graduated from Tech in 1960, but I did attend Morton through my junior year. I was in Mr. Ford's Aviation Powerplant class that met in downtown Hammond until it moved into the main school. It was a good move until we started one of the engines and filled the hallways with smoke, it was funny though. They wouldn't allow any engine starts after that. I attended the old Harding school and I was there when it moved into the new building. One day in the new building the boiler exploded and we had a real fire drill, I think the janitor might have been killed in the explosion. I read in some real old posts here about the woods north of the new Harding building and I remember the woods and the building of the Eastgate community, I fell through the ice on the way home from Harding one day and remember my pants freezing and clunking when I walked, I was lucky to have survived my time in Hessville but it sure was fun. a few freinds and I used to time ouselves riding our bikes from the parking lot of the new Harding through the little wooded area next to the playground of the old Harding and back. We even learned to ride our bikes backward, sitting on the handlebars, what a rush of memories, one triggers the others, sorry for the ramble.

John

Edited by - johncmccann on 04/27/2007 20:01:59
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  18:52:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CJ -- I certainly remember watching Dominic do his thing with the crust at Cande's. In fact, he did it at the location on Kennedy also. I don't have a photo of the place, but here's the ad in the 1957 Top Hat. Actually, this is the whole page of ads. Since it's only around 60kb, I'll just go ahead and post the image instead of the link.



Ken -- Morton High School 1960
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  19:19:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lynn,

Omigosh. Tom and Barb Chess! I knew them both. IIRC they were my best friend Ed Lipke's cousins. I also dated Barb in the Spring of 1969. I wonder where these two are now?

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond

-----------------------------


quote:
Originally posted by lynndesert

Thank you for the welcome.

Tom Chess
Barbara Chess

Lynn-Morton graduate


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lynndesert

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  19:25:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi CJ,
That is not my cousin. Here he is. Mike Opperman played drums in a band called Citations. Guy on right played guitar was Kim Pramuda, something like that. He lived around Knickerbocker and dad was a doctor. He was my first "official" date. There was another guy named Roger in the band that is not in this photo. This was taken at my brother's First Holy Communion, around 1964-1965.
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  19:43:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chris & All,

Here is the link (I hope it works!) to a great IHB site, the IHB Archive Page. Lots of interesting info, history, photos, (including some by yours truly), maps, etc. It is basically run by Lafayette IN resident Bill Gustason, a rail historian and fellow railfan.

I hope you enjoy it.

Mike Rapchak Jr.

http://dhke.com/ihbarchive/

-----------------------------------------------

[quote]Originally posted by seejay2

Oh yes, the trains. I wish DEEDEE were here now because she could back me up on this one. Both of our fathers were engineers for IHB out of the Gibson yard, also refered to as the roundhouse.

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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  20:06:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What a neat site! If dad were alive today, he would never come down off that site. He wouldn't be able to pull himself from the hot water jobs.
Hey Mike, do you remember in 62, some dude who had an afinity for the steamers bought one and ran it around the country live. It came to a Hammond station and all kinds of people were there to film it and look at it. Dad took some 8mm of it, and I have one pic of my brother and I standing by the huge wheels. I waited 'till it stopped so I wouldn't get sucked in....Cj
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Pro2am

USA
169 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  20:11:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom,

This is a fantastic essay. You have portrayed the enchanting essence of your experiences extremely well. Although never blessed with such a magical nighttime location, I recall the nights I spent as a child lying in bed and listening to the train horns in the distance. Living in Woodmar during the 1950s we weren't far from the Erie Railroad's (Erie-Lackawanna as of 1960) 2-track mainline. Hessville during the 1960s gave us the Nickel Plate Road (absorbed by Norfolk & Western around 1964 and now Norfolk Southern). And the IHB switchers with their gurgling little single-tone "bugle" horns were a constant companion. How sad that IHB has retired all but one or two of their late-1940s-vintage switchers. There was also the north-south NYC/MC Danville Secondary (now called the Kankakee Line) that ran by the National Guard Armory on 173rd St. And several others.

Matter of fact, I still listen to trains on these same lines every chance I get. Nighttime is still the most enchanting. Those horns bring such a sense of peace and happiness; they've always affected me this way. And the best thing about it all is that, unlike so much of the world around us, the railroads and their sounds in this area are basically the same as they were 45 years ago; a timeless, ageless facet of life. So listening to them today is the same as it was back in the late 1950s or early 1960s.

Of course I'm talking diesels here. As enjoyable as they can be they can't hold a candle to the steam locomotives visually and aurally. Although I was around during steam's final days I can hardly recall any of it (this really bugs me).

Again, thanks for a marvellous read!

Mike Rapchak Jr.

------------------------------

[quote]Originally posted by Tom J

You guys have taken this discussion to the subject of trains, and I LOVE trains, especially trains from the days of the steam locomotives.

I remember very well the steam locomotives from the summers I spent at my grandmother's house in Kentucky. The following is a little essay I wrote about my memories of summer nights at my grandmother's house. Her house was less than 100 feet from the railroad tracks.


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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  20:41:50  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pro2am

Tom,

This is a fantastic essay. You have portrayed the enchanting essence of your experiences extremely well. Although never blessed with such a magical nighttime location, I recall the nights I spent as a child lying in bed and listening to the train horns in the distance. Living in Woodmar during the 1950s we weren't far from the Erie Railroad's (Erie-Lackawanna as of 1960) 2-track mainline. Hessville during the 1960s gave us the Nickel Plate Road (absorbed by Norfolk & Western around 1964 and now Norfolk Southern). And the IHB switchers with their gurgling little single-tone "bugle" horns were a constant companion. How sad that IHB has retired all but one or two of their late-1940s-vintage switchers. There was also the north-south NYC/MC Danville Secondary (now called the Kankakee Line) that ran by the National Guard Armory on 173rd St. And several others.

Matter of fact, I still listen to trains on these same lines every chance I get. Nighttime is still the most enchanting. Those horns bring such a sense of peace and happiness; they've always affected me this way. And the best thing about it all is that, unlike so much of the world around us, the railroads and their sounds in this area are basically the same as they were 45 years ago; a timeless, ageless facet of life. So listening to them today is the same as it was back in the late 1950s or early 1960s.

Of course I'm talking diesels here. As enjoyable as they can be they can't hold a candle to the steam locomotives visually and aurally. Although I was around during steam's final days I can hardly recall any of it (this really bugs me).

Again, thanks for a marvellous read!

Mike Rapchak Jr.

----------------------------



Mike:

Thanks for the kind words regarding my little essay. I find it very easy to write about the things that I remember from my childhood. I had a great childhood, and I thank God for it.

I have said it before, and I say it again here and now... I would NOT exchange the time of my birth for any time in history. I don't think today's kids are going to have any memories worth reminiscing about when they are our age. The world has grown cold, impersonal, and sterile, compared to the world we grew up in.

Tom


A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!
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lynndesert

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2007 :  21:30:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Mike,
They are all my cousins, forgot a few. Heard Tommy just moved back to Indiana. Barbara married George, a Greek and had two children. They divorced a long time ago and not sure what happened after that. I think Barbara is still living in Nevada. Ed is still in Hessville. We've been talking about a big family reunion but that's as far as it's gotten.

Lynn
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johncmccann

USA
39 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  01:02:04  Show Profile  Visit johncmccann's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Bucko

[quote]Originally posted by eyebab
Thanks for naming A&P. I remember going to that grocery store, when very young, but couldn't remember the name. Around 1957 or 1958 it closed when A&P opened their larger, brand new store on 165th and Alexander.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63


After the A&P moved Gregory Markets opened there to expand on their 173rd and Kennedy market, I had the displeasure of cleaning it after it had been closed for awhile as I worked for Gregory's. There was a Shell Station owned by Si Weiss at Gibson and Kennedy on the SE corner, there was also a full service Car wash between there and the Nook which was also called the Huddle for awhile.

John

Edited by - johncmccann on 04/28/2007 01:05:54
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  08:59:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Lynn,
No big deal, just thought you may find this interesting. This piece comes from a Hammond City directory dating back to around 1950. It lists Permuda about 2/3 of the way down...........Cj
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  09:38:39  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
John McCann:

I lived on top of Gregory's. Moved out in1960.Welcome to our joyous group..

My brother is the"Trainee" in our family and can give lectures which last for hours. I am going to see if he will join us.

Linda
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  09:39:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CJ -- Could you post or give a link to the complete 6700 block of Kennedy from that old directory? Thanks.

Ken -- Morton High School 1960

Edited by - wvcogs on 04/28/2007 09:44:03
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  09:54:03  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Ken

Did you get the MAP?
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  10:00:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not yet. When did you send it?
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  10:05:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim -- If you were at 2630, you must have been almost next door to Bucko. We haven't heard from Bill in a while. Ken...
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wvcogs

USA
564 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  11:42:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I heard a rumor recently that the old Hansen Branch library on Martha Street in Hessville was torn down recently. Does anyone know if that rumor is true or not. I certainly hope it is not true. Those of us from that area have a lot good memories about times spent at the Hansen Branch. If it's still there, maybe a photo of the building can be another assignment for CJ.

Ken -- Morton High School 1960
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seejay2

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  11:59:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken,
Here is the 6700 block of Kennedy............Cj
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svea3

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  12:33:25  Show Profile  Send svea3 an ICQ Message  Click to see svea3's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
A week ago, right after I told you about it. I sent it 1st class, but it is a tube!
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johncmccann

USA
39 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2007 :  12:34:46  Show Profile  Visit johncmccann's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by svea3

John McCann:

I lived on top of Gregory's. Moved out in1960.Welcome to our joyous group..

My brother is the"Trainee" in our family and can give lectures which last for hours. I am going to see if he will join us.

Linda


I probably bagged groceries for you or for your parents if you or they shopped at Gregory's. I just thought of a name from that time, I think a man named Pete was the store manager, real thin and wiry. Another friend I met there was Danny Mayden.

John
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