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BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  12:10:43  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
The house I bought on the north side had that siding. I don't remember what it was called. Our house and the in-laws was the asbestos shingles.
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  12:45:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

The house I bought on the north side had that siding. I don't remember what it was called. Our house and the in-laws was the asbestos shingles.



Our house in the Grand Park neighborhood of Hessville and several in our neighborhood had those Asphalt wannabe brick-look shingles.

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EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  12:49:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I hope I didn't offend anyone whose house had that asphalt siding. I don't doubt a lot of those houses kept their siding in tact.
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

The house I bought on the north side had that siding. I don't remember what it was called. Our house and the in-laws was the asbestos shingles.

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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  14:41:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
EHB,
No offense taken---that siding was what it was and nothing lasts forever--except maybe brick if it is kept up and tended to--I think the asphalt siding was an insulator and from what I have read about it, it was put on with a heat source, kinda sealed to the wood rather than nailed on???? I dunno, though!


quote:
Originally posted by EastHammondBoomer

I hope I didn't offend anyone whose house had that asphalt siding. I don't doubt a lot of those houses kept their siding in tact.
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

The house I bought on the north side had that siding. I don't remember what it was called. Our house and the in-laws was the asbestos shingles.



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BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  15:38:15  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
It had and overlapping edge and they were nailed from what I remember doing maintenance. Something like a tongue and groove but not.
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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  17:15:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, Bob--- I went back to find what I had read. Actually MISREAD!
In 1940 Sears, Roebuck & Company catalogues offered brick-type insulating panels in 14" X 43" units, five bricks high and four-point (hexagonal) asphalt siding in brown tone, red tone, jade green and tile red. Advances in the production of roll
Rolled asphalt brick siding was made possible through the introduction of heated rollers that pressed patterns into the surface

I am sure my dad got the brown stuff from Sears because to afford the house, he helped to build it. Our neighbor's house was a gray version of the same siding.
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

It had and overlapping edge and they were nailed from what I remember doing maintenance. Something like a tongue and groove but not.



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!
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BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  18:42:46  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Mine was like a blonde brick.

Bob
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EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2010 :  08:48:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


I realize I may not be from the same era as most here on this forum, but I like reading the personal experiences and memories...some humours while others touching if not inspirational. With that being said (or written), I recall the local gas stations (fillin' stations heard here in the Bluegrass state) from my early Region days. I'd get a free STP sticker at my corner Phillips 66 dependending on who was at the cash register (and what mood he was in). Just yesterday I had to shell (pun intended) out 75 cents for air in my tires!

Sometimes as we'd drive through other towns, cites or states, I'd see some gas station with a name I didn't know. As we went through Arkansas I recall Lion brand gas. I'm sure there are tons of other renamed or defunct gas brands out there. I remember Gulf was a TV sponsor for The Wonderful World of Disney (wathched it every Sunday). Later in my life I was stationed in the Persian Gulf. We were part of the one-day-war called Operation Praying Mantis.

Does anyone have any memeories or interesting info about fillin' stations?

Dave G
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2010 :  12:19:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great memories there.

My favorite - Standard Oil ('cause the refinery was in Whiting)
Their slogan was "As you travel, ask us!"
I've still got several (free) highway maps of Indiana and Illinois from Standard, Sinclair, etc. I really miss the guy with the greasy squeeze bottle that would squirt the liquid on your window and wipe down the windows...only to have them more smeared than before.
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MrRazz

USA
52 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2010 :  20:18:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Remember that the gas station was a great place to warm up when delivering newspapers in the middle of winter and an oasis in the hot summertime after downing a cold "pop" or 2.

My dad swore Shell and Clark gas made his car run better...premium of course.

Air was free, and sometimes the attendant would fix a flat on your bicycle for free.

Oil sat in a rack by the pump and they would even put it in for you.

Attendants wore uniforms...some with caps and a name on the uniform, so you knew who they were.

What ever happened to the competitive "gas wars"?

Usually could get your car fixed there without having to go to the dealership.

Times have changed...ya' think?
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2010 :  06:09:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Do you remember Purple Martin gas? The attendants had to wear purple tights for a while. Remember when you got a gift with a fillup? A nice coffee mug or drinking glass (collect the whole set) or an ice scraper or a key chain or a toy. Remember when they got a quart of oil out of a red tank with a crank pump on top. Remember when they put a quart of oil in, they put the cardboard oil can on a tank upside down to drain the can? We were sitting on a fence on the corner of Waltham and Hohman one night watching the cars pull in and out of the Clark station. This red Chevy pulls in with three guys in the front seat and three girls in the back. They were all dressed up to go to the drive-in. They got a dollar in gas and a pack of cigarettes. When they started to leave, the driver spotted us and said something cute to the kids in the car. They all laughed. He gunned the car and popped the clutch. Sounded like an explosion and we saw parts shooting all over the street. As we walked away laughing so hard, the tears rolled down our cheeks and our cheeks ached. The car and its occupants sat quietly halfway in Hohman Ave and halfway in the Clark station. Tom W
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duane

381 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2010 :  15:32:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As I recall there was a Purple Martin station near Calumet Ave around 148th ro 145th St?

I remember the commercials for Purple Martin Ethyl.
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BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2010 :  15:47:23  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I think it was Calumet and Chicago Duane. SE corner.
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2010 :  00:44:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob's right. I spent a lot of time around that corner cause I worked for the Mills family for a few years and their old place was behind Clara's lunch near Chicago and Calumet. (Mills Electric Co.) Tom W
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2010 :  08:25:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This sounds like the stuff my father bought off tv from the greatest tv salesman of all time--MARTY FAY. The stuff was called inso-brick and it looked like old red bricks with black trim. The stuff lasted about ten years before it was replaced with aluminium siding. I remember that it didn't hold up well when being hit by a baseball. My father also bought storm windows from Marty Fay which ment that the screen windows no longer were changed twice a year for glass storm windows.
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

Yes, Bob--- I went back to find what I had read. Actually MISREAD!
In 1940 Sears, Roebuck & Company catalogues offered brick-type insulating panels in 14" X 43" units, five bricks high and four-point (hexagonal) asphalt siding in brown tone, red tone, jade green and tile red. Advances in the production of roll
Rolled asphalt brick siding was made possible through the introduction of heated rollers that pressed patterns into the surface

I am sure my dad got the brown stuff from Sears because to afford the house, he helped to build it. Our neighbor's house was a gray version of the same siding.
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

It had and overlapping edge and they were nailed from what I remember doing maintenance. Something like a tongue and groove but not.



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

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S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2010 :  09:27:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, your mention of Marty Faye brought back memories of early TV "infomercials". I found this online by googling his name:
The dateline was 1992 and the state was Florida
Marty Faye, 70, the raspy-mouthed maverick of Chicago radio and television for more than 30 years, died Friday in North Miami Beach, Fla., of a heart attack.

Mr. Faye developed his distinctive voice while starting out in commercials in New York.

"I was in New York, and I couldn't sell anything until I raised it two octaves or so, and then suddenly everything came together," Mr. Faye said in a 1973 newspaper interview.

Born in Brooklyn, Mr. Faye was a graduate of Samuel Tilden High School. He attended St. John's University in New York, where he studied pre-law.

During summers while he attended college, Mr. Faye sold kitchen gadgets in a dime store in New York. He was so good at it ...

There are also articles about his sister and his daughter, both in the limelight entertainment/politics. I can remember my Dad grumbling everytime Marty Faye came on the screen! [:D


quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

This sounds like the stuff my father bought off tv from the greatest tv salesman of all time--MARTY FAY. The stuff was called inso-brick and it looked like old red bricks with black trim. The stuff lasted about ten years before it was replaced with aluminium siding. I remember that it didn't hold up well when being hit by a baseball. My father also bought storm windows from Marty Fay which ment that the screen windows no longer were changed twice a year for glass storm windows.
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

Yes, Bob--- I went back to find what I had read. Actually MISREAD!
In 1940 Sears, Roebuck & Company catalogues offered brick-type insulating panels in 14" X 43" units, five bricks high and four-point (hexagonal) asphalt siding in brown tone, red tone, jade green and tile red. Advances in the production of roll
Rolled asphalt brick siding was made possible through the introduction of heated rollers that pressed patterns into the surface

I am sure my dad got the brown stuff from Sears because to afford the house, he helped to build it. Our neighbor's house was a gray version of the same siding.
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

It had and overlapping edge and they were nailed from what I remember doing maintenance. Something like a tongue and groove but not.



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!





Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

Edited by - S C Jones on 01/18/2010 09:31:37
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2010 :  16:31:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My dad, Chicago radio guy Mike Rapchak, knew Marty Faye very well and worked with him at WAAF during the mid-50's (somewhere we have photos of them together in the studio). My dad thought Marty was a big pain-in-the-_____, but basically an OK guy.

He told me of a time when Marty was on the air LIVE reading a commercial...something to do with picture frames or picture lockets of some sort. Anyway, my dad gets a big 8x10" photo of Marty and sticks it into a toilet seat that he had just bought for our home; Marty is reading the commercial LIVE ON THE AIR, and my dad is on the other side of the sound booth window, gets Marty's attention, then OPENS the toilet seat lid to reveal the portrait of Marty with a big s___-eating grin on his face.

Mr. Faye..
how shall we say....
failed to make it through the commerical
that day.

LR

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 01/18/2010 16:51:04
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2010 :  17:35:04  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Cool, cool story, Larry! That is FUNNY! Share all ya got like that!

Tom
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BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/22/2010 :  04:39:26  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I tried to post a new topic but it's not working.

MINAS HISTORY BOOK:

http://nwitimes.com/news/local/article_9c50e883-9c79-53d7-a33d-2e8745c174c0.html
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/22/2010 :  06:33:38  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

I tried to post a new topic but it's not working.

MINAS HISTORY BOOK:

http://nwitimes.com/news/local/article_9c50e883-9c79-53d7-a33d-2e8745c174c0.html



Bob, this is HUGE! I don't know why you were not able to start a new thread, but I will be glad to do so and copy your post there.

THANK YOU!

Tom
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 01/22/2010 :  07:33:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great story! I hope you can dig up some photos of these two together. I can still hear Fay's voice in my head. I wonder if there is a recording of him somewhere? Thanks again for that!
quote:
Originally posted by HassoBenSoba

My dad, Chicago radio guy Mike Rapchak, knew Marty Faye very well and worked with him at WAAF during the mid-50's (somewhere we have photos of them together in the studio). My dad thought Marty was a big pain-in-the-_____, but basically an OK guy.

He told me of a time when Marty was on the air LIVE reading a commercial...something to do with picture frames or picture lockets of some sort. Anyway, my dad gets a big 8x10" photo of Marty and sticks it into a toilet seat that he had just bought for our home; Marty is reading the commercial LIVE ON THE AIR, and my dad is on the other side of the sound booth window, gets Marty's attention, then OPENS the toilet seat lid to reveal the portrait of Marty with a big s___-eating grin on his face.

Mr. Faye..
how shall we say....
failed to make it through the commerical
that day.

LR

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Cindy M

15 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  02:00:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How 'bout Big Top Supermarket at the corner of 165th and Grand Ave. in where else, good ole Hessville?

A gas station once also occupied this corner..Standard I think.

And Roy's Pharmacy just a little west of it on 165th.

The buildings seem to still be there, but no idea what they are now.
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  08:42:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Big Top was my first paying job, 1960 it paid $.50 an hour as a bag boy.
I don't remember who owned, operated the Standard station, but we used Roy's Pharmacy in the '70s.

Roger D.
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  10:23:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Was that a Big Top that Dick Tiebel had on the corner of Routes 41 and 30 kitty corner from his parents restaurant? We worked there for a short while too. We could start another blog just naming the places that we worked. No wonder people say "With your work experience, you must be at least 150 years old." One of the greatest things about growing up in the region was the availability of work. Funny thing was, the reason that we left around the end of the 80s was because of the LACK of work. Any other opinions, please? Tom W
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  11:12:32  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Was that a Big Top that Dick Tiebel had on the corner of Routes 41 and 30 kitty corner from his parents restaurant? We worked there for a short while too. We could start another blog just naming the places that we worked. No wonder people say "With your work experience, you must be at least 150 years old." One of the greatest things about growing up in the region was the availability of work. Funny thing was, the reason that we left around the end of the 80s was because of the LACK of work. Any other opinions, please? Tom W



I left Hammond before the decline, so I can only remember the good times, the times when there was work for all who wanted to work.

That was one thing about growing up in The Region in the good old days: we learned the work ethic. Our parents taught us to work for what we wanted and not to expect to have everything handed to us.

Tomster
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MrRazz

USA
52 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  12:45:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I delivered the Hammond Times just south of there on Grand, Montana, Missouri, Maryland, and Kentucky during the '60's. Remember stopping at Big Top for snacks. Also, the Standard station was my refuge where I would warm up from those cold winter evening walks making my deliveries and my oasis for a cold "pop" during the heat of the summer.
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  16:14:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Believe it or not, we walked from north Hammond to Tech every day. We stopped under the Womder Bread fan in the winter to warm up on the way to school. If it was real cold, we stopped at White Castle for a hot coco. Later on, we stopped at Bartons. On the way home, we always stopped at Miner Dunn for french fries and a garbage Coke. By the way, I still have garbage Cokes today at Steak and Shake. Reminds me of Kwi-Kee Snax on Hohman and Douglas. Tom W
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Cindy M

15 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  17:37:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MrRazz

I delivered the Hammond Times just south of there on Grand, Montana, Missouri, Maryland, and Kentucky during the '60's. Remember stopping at Big Top for snacks. Also, the Standard station was my refuge where I would warm up from those cold winter evening walks making my deliveries and my oasis for a cold "pop" during the heat of the summer.



And it is here we brought our bikes to fill the tires with air. We had such busy, busy bikes!
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Cindy M

15 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2010 :  17:44:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Every now and then Big Top would have, just to the right of the doors as you enter them, a big thing at which someone would be standing frying up fresh donuts.

Between Roy's and Big Top, we spent nearly every penny, dime, nickle, and even the occasional quarter (a fortune!) on candy and other wonderful delights.

Roy's was great for candy necklaces, wax "soda" bottles, wax lips..wax teeth! And punkin seeds.

Big Top was great for the wonderful array of Hostess yummies..cupcakes, fried fruit pies, Snoballs. Mmmm.

Oh! And tootsie rolls, tootsie roll pops, M&M's, Heath Bars, jaw breakers!

Edited by - Cindy M on 01/31/2010 17:46:01
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2010 :  19:01:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom J mentioned the work ethic we learned from our parents and he knows what he is talking about. For those of you who don't know Tom's dad was a MAN to be looked up to. His father, Paul, lost his left arm when he about 16 due to a hunting accident. He married, raised a family and worked providing for that family and still found time to fish and hunt. He never depended on anyone to support him. He is a man to be looked up to as I have said.
I knew Tom's dad, and to see him drive that stick shift Ford Econoline Van, shift gears and eat a Snickers bar all with one hand was amazing!!

Roger D.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2010 :  19:10:27  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Roger D

Tom J mentioned the work ethic we learned from our parents and he knows what he is talking about. For those of you who don't know Tom's dad was a MAN to be looked up to. His father, Paul, lost his left arm when he about 16 due to a hunting accident. He married, raised a family and worked providing for that family and still found time to fish and hunt. He never depended on anyone to support him. He is a man to be looked up to as I have said.
I knew Tom's dad, and to see him drive that stick shift Ford Econoline Van, shift gears and eat a Snickers bar all with one hand was amazing!!

Roger D.



Thanks, Roger, for the kind words about Dad. He truly was quite a man, and I am proud to be his son.

He worked two jobs to support us so that Mom would not have to work outside the home.

Tomster
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BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2010 :  20:33:58  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Tom, I can picture your Dad at work in my mind. Didn't he carry some kind of hand sign that he held under his left arm? I saw him quite regularly when I worked at Sears.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2010 :  21:08:07  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

Tom, I can picture your Dad at work in my mind. Didn't he carry some kind of hand sign that he held under his left arm? I saw him quite regularly when I worked at Sears.



It was Dad's left arm that was missing, Bob. I don't know of any sign that he would have carried in his work at Minas's.

Tom
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BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2010 :  21:12:18  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
OK Tom, I don't know either. It was a long time ago and not all memories are that clear.
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 02/02/2010 :  06:08:31  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

OK Tom, I don't know either. It was a long time ago and not all memories are that clear.



Yeah, I know how THAT goes. Wouldn't it be cool if somehow we could get all of our memories cleared right up, as if they had just happened?

Tom
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 02/02/2010 :  07:16:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I know this is a bit late but thanks for the info on Marty Faye. I guess voice of his will live forever in my mind.
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

Jim, your mention of Marty Faye brought back memories of early TV "infomercials". I found this online by googling his name:
The dateline was 1992 and the state was Florida
Marty Faye, 70, the raspy-mouthed maverick of Chicago radio and television for more than 30 years, died Friday in North Miami Beach, Fla., of a heart attack.

Mr. Faye developed his distinctive voice while starting out in commercials in New York.

"I was in New York, and I couldn't sell anything until I raised it two octaves or so, and then suddenly everything came together," Mr. Faye said in a 1973 newspaper interview.

Born in Brooklyn, Mr. Faye was a graduate of Samuel Tilden High School. He attended St. John's University in New York, where he studied pre-law.

During summers while he attended college, Mr. Faye sold kitchen gadgets in a dime store in New York. He was so good at it ...

There are also articles about his sister and his daughter, both in the limelight entertainment/politics. I can remember my Dad grumbling everytime Marty Faye came on the screen! [:D


quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

This sounds like the stuff my father bought off tv from the greatest tv salesman of all time--MARTY FAY. The stuff was called inso-brick and it looked like old red bricks with black trim. The stuff lasted about ten years before it was replaced with aluminium siding. I remember that it didn't hold up well when being hit by a baseball. My father also bought storm windows from Marty Fay which ment that the screen windows no longer were changed twice a year for glass storm windows.
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

Yes, Bob--- I went back to find what I had read. Actually MISREAD!
In 1940 Sears, Roebuck & Company catalogues offered brick-type insulating panels in 14" X 43" units, five bricks high and four-point (hexagonal) asphalt siding in brown tone, red tone, jade green and tile red. Advances in the production of roll
Rolled asphalt brick siding was made possible through the introduction of heated rollers that pressed patterns into the surface

I am sure my dad got the brown stuff from Sears because to afford the house, he helped to build it. Our neighbor's house was a gray version of the same siding.
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

It had and overlapping edge and they were nailed from what I remember doing maintenance. Something like a tongue and groove but not.



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!





Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

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Doug G

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2010 :  13:25:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Joel357

Both Howard's Cab and Hammond Yellow were customers of mine. They had Motorola Business Dispatchers(made specifically for the taxi industry)in the cars. Those Checker American cars were built like brick S*&t Houses and they would put 400,000 to 500,000 miles on them. They wanted to have a majority of their fleet Checker American because they wouldn't have to carry parts from different manufacturers in stock. Now, the cab companies buy mostly Ford Crown Vics from police departments. Those are old police cruisers.

Joel

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Doug G

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2010 :  13:30:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My post above was suppsed to state that the cabs were Checker Marathons if I remember correctly. I drove for Hammond Yellow a few times as 2nd and 3rd jobs. They were owned (at that time) by Tom and Pete. Their last name was Coulas (I think).
Those were some rugged vehicles.
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Doug G

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2010 :  13:38:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tsofred

Kwikee Snax,Manhattan Lunch,The Kettle,Chat & Chew,Pow Wow,Serenade,Kelly's,Prince Castle,Cam Lan,41 Outdoor,Moonlight Drive In ,(Cline & Michigan aves),Pauls Drive In,Arts Drive In(Caumet Ave) Arts (five points)Nick & Georges on State & State Line,(cancer clinic) Nick & georges moved to Hohman Ave across from Harrison Park...still have the dreatest steaks anywhere...Maid Rite,Red Rooster,Jim;s Drive In,The Mirth Drive In,Woodmar Shopping Center,(all that is left is Carsons),



As a teenager, I worked at Jim's Drive In. I can remember that it was open all night (I worked midnights with my mom). I also remember that we got a lot of the police officers. They were never charged for their food although they always tipped the server. Because of Jim's jukebox, I became a fan of country music instead of the music my contemporaries listened to!
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2010 :  14:01:41  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Doug G

My post above was suppsed to state that the cabs were Checker Marathons if I remember correctly. I drove for Hammond Yellow a few times as 2nd and 3rd jobs. They were owned (at that time) by Tom and Pete. Their last name was Coulas (I think).
Those were some rugged vehicles.



Doug:

The little icon with the pencil is the edit button. You can click on that and then make changes in or additions to your post.

Tom
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2010 :  15:29:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Doug; Jim's drive-in had the best T-bone steaks in the known universe. I remember going in one night with Joe Mis from the Yankee Inn on the corner of Calumet and Hoffman. He bet me twenty bucks that I couldn't eat a dozen eggs with potatoes, sausage, toast and coffee. I won. Those were the days. If I knew that I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself. LOL Tom W
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2010 :  04:47:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was reading the site this morning and suddenly came up with a name from the past and can't remember what it was or where it was. maybe you guys can help. Does anyone remember a store called Dildine's?
Tom W
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2010 :  06:07:47  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tom:

Dildine's was a hobby shop and toy store on Calumet Avenue. I think they had slot car races there from what I have read. I don't believe that I was ever in the store.

The 1965 City Directory shows a "Dildine's Lawnmower Repair" at 5711 Calumet Avenue. I don't remember that it was a lawnmower shop, but I guess it must have been that too.

Tom
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2010 :  08:53:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They did a little of everything. They were on Calumet ave. Up a block or so and across the street from the Calumet theater. They were the second best place in Hammond to buy Lionel trains. Of course Minas's only sold trains during the Christmas season. The layout was downstairs and one year the basement got flooded and ruined their stock. I still have a semifore bridge from that sale.
quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

Tom:

Dildine's was a hobby shop and toy store on Calumet Avenue. I think they had slot car races there from what I have read. I don't believe that I was ever in the store.

The 1965 City Directory shows a "Dildine's Lawnmower Repair" at 5711 Calumet Avenue. I don't remember that it was a lawnmower shop, but I guess it must have been that too.

Tom

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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2010 :  10:24:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, Thanks guys. You cleared it up. When Dildines
went out of business, the empty store was rented by a company called National Electronics Institute. They had four courses. Radio, TV, industrial electronics and first class F.C.C. licensing. I went thru the first three and wanted the fourth. Most of the students wanted TV repair so they all dropped out after radio and TV. One other guy wanted first class. I'll never forget standing in that rented storefront with those other two guys and staring at the floor when the instructor said "I'm not gonna teach a class for 2 guys." I had never been inside Dildines but I remembered people talking about it. Thanx guys.
Tom W
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2010 :  03:24:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As soon as I figure out how to do it, I am going to post on You Tube a 45-minute video documentary that I made a few years ago about Hammond's "MOM and POP" Toy Stores of the 1950's and '60's; Dildine's is included in it, even though I incorrectly remembered it as being on Columbia and not Calumet Ave. That mistake of mine was corrected in an interview (also taped) that I did with Ted Maka, the owner/proprieter of MAKA's Variety Store on Columbia Ave near 172nd.

Included on the documentary are: 1.) Pint Size 2.) Sharon Mae's 3.) Hessville Hobbies 4.) Stern's Hardware 5.) Newberry's 6.) Stork Town 7.) Pla-Time 8.) Calumet Hobby Time 9.) McCauley's 10). Maka's 11.) Gentry's 12.) Dildine's and 14.) Pee-Wee's (Highland). I hope to post the video soon.

Ted Maka had many detailed memories of the Calumet area and its hobby stores. Maka's sold American Flyer, etc but Dildine's was the area's only authorized Lionel dealer. Ted knew the guy who owned Dildine's quite well--friendly competitiors, you might say. My dad took me to Dildine's before Christmas in 1961, and I remember being fascinated by the Lionel "Aquarium Car" which I saw on display there. In 1978 I took a casette recorder for repair to the business that took over the store-front. The building at 5711 Calumet is still standing, but it's glory years are, unfortunately, LONG gone.
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2010 :  08:17:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After closing in Hammond didn't Dildines move to Indpls. Blvd. in Highland, but on a smaller scale? I vagely remember a sign south of Ridge Road on the west side of the street.

Roger D.
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Dave

USA
30 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2010 :  08:26:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I remember a hobby store on Calumet in Whiting/Robertsdale. No name pops into my head though. It was on the east side of the street, maybe 117th street? It was the nearest place to home where I could get individual pieces of HO slot car tracks.
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2010 :  08:38:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So when did Dildines close. Anybody remember?
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Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2010 :  11:49:55  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Larry, I am anxiously awaiting that video of yours. Hurry up and "get smart." :)

Tom
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