Shep Talk Forum - sheptalk.flicklives.com
Shep Talk Forum - sheptalk.flicklives.com
Home | Profile | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 General Talk
 Hammond Indiana
 Gone but not forgotten.
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 5

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2009 :  13:07:14  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks S C. I can barely remember it and it was the Clinton and Erie RR location that I vaguely remember.

Bob
Go to Top of Page

duane

381 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2009 :  23:34:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Larry; It was T 150TH Street and Cedar Ave, the back was toward Calumet Ave. I don,t remember a 159th in Hammond, Just in Illinois. I also remember a trucking company on a short,one block long street between Pine and Oak off of 150th. The company was Nowak Trucking or Welsh Brothers and the street was Trankle Court. Anyone else remember this? Anyone remember the smell of the Queen Anne candy factory or the sound of their noon whistle that also blew at 8:00 AM and 10,10:15,12:30,2:00,2:15 and 4:00 but we called it the noon whistle. Regards, Tom W


Welsh Brothers Trucking! That's the one I was trying to remember. My sister worked there during high school as a clerk. Boy they had some old beat up trucks that no one else would operate. Always breaking down too.
Go to Top of Page

RicKoe

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2009 :  23:51:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones


from 1898 to 1929

The Hammond Dairy

Formerly located at
Fayette Street and Oakley Avenue -
Clinton Street and the Erie Railroad

If the Hammond Dairy were still around today it would be celebrating its centennial. Founded just before the turn of this century, by two brothers Louis and Paul Klitzke. The two enterprising young businessmen started out with just one horse and one wagon. But their small milk business would not remain small for very long. The dairy started off as a one story red brick building with a second story being add to the building to house the dairy's 75 horses. In fact their modest sized Hammond milk depot would at one time be the second largest dairy in the entire state of Indiana in it's heyday, second only to a dairy in Indianapolis. The Hammond Dairy had a peak production capacity of 100,000 pounds of milk per day.

The Hammond Dairy was well known in the industry for it's state of the art equipment. The plant on Oakley Avenue was enlarged several times so that new equipment could be installed. The Hammond Dairy Company's refrigeration, pasteurization and sterilization equipment was the best of it's kind in the nation. The Hammond Dairy Company produced milk and milk products including butter, cheese, whipped cream and it's famous "Velvet Brand Ice Cream". The ice cream was made on the second floor then sent down to the freezer on the first floor, where it was put into containers. Machines to manufacture Eskimo Bars were on the first floor in the former office space of the original dairy and were wrapped in foil by hand in the old days.

In 1921 the dairy was enlarged with a new structure built on Clinton Street, just east of the Erie RR. This helped make use of a rail spur in which the raw milk shipped from Arkon IN was pumped into a receiving tank to await processing. The Company was always quick to keep pace with the city's rapid growth and to keep up with it's growing demand and customer base. Borden's Dairy purchased the company in 1929. The Borden's company made a major expansion in the late 1950's which included a new milk receiving room, testing laboratory, paper carton storage room, enlarged cooler area, enlarged bottling room, in floor conveyors and a new loading dock. Due to shifting markets the plant was phased out and later closed. One of the last remaining plant structures was razed during 1972. Ending a part of the city's industrial history.


Go to Top of Page

HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2009 :  01:47:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom-- I can't believe I screwed up ANOTHER post; yes, it was 150th and Cedar (I managed to get it right in my initial Dec 12th post about the Dairy).

I couldn't even get my USER NAME right when I signed up for Sheptalk; I took it from the 3 Stooges short "Malice in the Palace". The mid-eastern tough-guy played by Vernon Dent is named "Hassan Ben Sober" (to which Shemp replies: "I've had a few too many myself!")


quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Larry; It was T 150TH Street and Cedar Ave, the back was toward Calumet Ave. I don,t remember a 159th in Hammond, Just in Illinois. I also remember a trucking company on a short,one block long street between Pine and Oak off of 150th. The company was Nowak Trucking or Welsh Brothers and the street was Trankle Court. Anyone else remember this? Anyone remember the smell of the Queen Anne candy factory or the sound of their noon whistle that also blew at 8:00 AM and 10,10:15,12:30,2:00,2:15 and 4:00 but we called it the noon whistle. Regards, Tom W



Go to Top of Page

Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2009 :  07:12:35  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by HassoBenSoba

Tom-- I can't believe I screwed up ANOTHER post; yes, it was 150th and Cedar (I managed to get it right in my initial Dec 12th post about the Dairy).

I couldn't even get my USER NAME right when I signed up for Sheptalk; I took it from the 3 Stooges short "Malice in the Palace". The mid-eastern tough-guy played by Vernon Dent is named "Hassan Ben Sober" (to which Shemp replies: "I've had a few too many myself!")


quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Larry; It was T 150TH Street and Cedar Ave, the back was toward Calumet Ave. I don,t remember a 159th in Hammond, Just in Illinois. I also remember a trucking company on a short,one block long street between Pine and Oak off of 150th. The company was Nowak Trucking or Welsh Brothers and the street was Trankle Court. Anyone else remember this? Anyone remember the smell of the Queen Anne candy factory or the sound of their noon whistle that also blew at 8:00 AM and 10,10:15,12:30,2:00,2:15 and 4:00 but we called it the noon whistle. Regards, Tom W







Well, Larry, just keep on "screwing up," because you have breathed new life into this message board since you have become an active poster.

Tom
Go to Top of Page

S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2009 :  11:38:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Edited by - S C Jones on 12/21/2009 22:12:23
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  09:31:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://www.falstaffbrewing.com/_borders/Plt11_e.jpg

Does anyone remember the old Falstaff silos located under the Chicago Skyway? My dad used to drive us all the way north on Calumet to where it intersected with Indinapolis Blvd right at the Lever Brothers plant.

We'd go west into South Chicago and drive all the way on US41 past a nice golf course onto south LSD. We'd go to museums or just enjoy the Chicago lake front.

On the way back to Hammond, we'd eat at the Howard Johnson across from the Holiday Inn on north Calumet. Those times live on in my heart and soul.

Now days, Howard Johnson's is another restaurant called Jonnel's (sp?), my parents divorced back in '72, my dad lives in Longview, Texas, my dear mother suffers from Alziemers and one of my two sisters passed away two years ago from Lupus. I keep in touch with my only surviving sister who lives in Chicago. I had wished my parents and my sisters and I could have had a reunion along with all the grandkids there at Jonnel's as if to relive those good ol' days but it can't happen. If anything, I now have realized I need to TREASURE, CHERISH and APPRECIATE the simple moments I have with my wife and kids even if it's at a local McD's.

Dave
Go to Top of Page

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  12:38:38  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I remember all those places. I lived a block west of the Holiday Inn. It and the Toll Road really messed up my play ground. Before all those buildings were built on the west side of Calumet from 141st to the 41 Drive-in, it was a play ground and camping grounds for a lot of us kids to have adventures. Stood there in 55 watching Standard Oil blow up and burn.
Go to Top of Page

tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  13:20:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was a night auditor at Ho-Jos and my best friends future wife was the hostess at the restaurant. During that time as I was working one night, Casius (sp?)Clay and his brother Rudy checked in. That musta been a while ago, huh? Tom W


Go to Top of Page

Dave

USA
30 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  14:43:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I well remember the Falstaff malt house/grain elevators alongside the Skyway. I could see them from my bedroom window. (Yes, we lived in Chicago.) My uncle worked there. We were chased by the Falstaff security guards for starting a brush fire in the no man's land between the Short Line and the Penn Central railroad tracks. They even fired a warning shot! Once Falstaff shut down, my friends and I would wander the property. A very dangerous pastime, as I recall there was a kid that died there wandering about alone. His body was not found for many months.
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  16:40:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not to stray too far away from Hammond as a topic, Dave, you mentioned living in Chicago near the Falstaff plant, that area has some strong childhood memories for me. My dad would take me and some of my friends to the shore along Lake Michigan which is now where the Hammond Marina is and we would illegally (sp?) go over the chainlink fence of the Edision plant and walk to the shore which was made up of huge cement blocks. There, we would "snag" fish. I recall using a big treble hook weighted down with sinkers. One day I snagged a big 10lb ugly carp.

It always amazed me how we could find rabbits and other small wildlife living among such an industrial area.
Go to Top of Page

Dave

USA
30 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  17:29:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Calumet Region is the most biologically diverse area in the interior of North America. In between the factories and refineries, you can find little bits of prairie, lakes, woodlands, rivers, swamps, dunes, savannas, etc., etc. I think that is a big part of the charm of the region. The scrub woods along Lake Michigan just south of the generating plant is a renowned birding site.

The Stateline generating plant is actually in Hammond so we're not straying too far off topic. A lot of people did the trespassing thing to do exactly what you did. The "rocks" around the plant were opened to the public (maybe in the 70s?) for fishing. (I wonder if they are still accessible?) We used to go smelt fishing there in the Spring.
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  17:57:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Thanks for the interesting info. I'm so glad to have joined this forum. So far I have learned a lot from fellow Regionites!

Dave
quote:
Originally posted by Dave

The Calumet Region is the most biologically diverse area in the interior of North America. In between the factories and refineries, you can find little bits of prairie, lakes, woodlands, rivers, swamps, dunes, savannas, etc., etc. I think that is a big part of the charm of the region. The scrub woods along Lake Michigan just south of the generating plant is a renowned birding site.

The Stateline generating plant is actually in Hammond so we're not straying too far off topic. A lot of people did the trespassing thing to do exactly what you did. The "rocks" around the plant were opened to the public (maybe in the 70s?) for fishing. (I wonder if they are still accessible?) We used to go smelt fishing there in the Spring.


Go to Top of Page

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  19:28:26  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I used to go perch fishing at the generating station. No one ever said anything about me going through the fence.
Go to Top of Page

MrRazz

USA
52 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  21:59:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Dave, you mentioned smelt fishing. My dad, brother, and I had the opportunity to go smelt fishing one time with the Lamberts (used to live on S. Arizona Ave). I was quite young, but it was a "hoot". Got alot of those little boogers. My mom fried them up, and they were oh, so good until she told us she hadn't cleaned the guts out of them. I guess she thought they were so small... kind of like sardines...that you didn't need to. Maybe that is common practice, I don't know, but it put a damper on our appetites. Good memory...
Go to Top of Page

duane

381 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  22:04:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dave

The Calumet Region is the most biologically diverse area in the interior of North America. In between the factories and refineries, you can find little bits of prairie, lakes, woodlands, rivers, swamps, dunes, savannas, etc., etc. I think that is a big part of the charm of the region. The scrub woods along Lake Michigan just south of the generating plant is a renowned birding site.

I don't want to be contrary, Dave, but you don't know how many times I have heard the statement "The XX area (insert whatever you want here)is the most biologically diverse area in the country" I have worked in natural resources for the past 35 years of my life and I have heard this said about every one of the 10 discrete areas that I have lived and worked. And yes, I have worked as a naturalist at Indiana Dunes and I am aware of the ecology, of Cowles Bog, or the (at the time) groundbreaking work that was done on ecological succession by studying distance and time from lakeshore southward.

It is easy to make such a statement, quite another thing to provide evidence to support or refute it once it is made. My take, each area is unique, each makes its own contribution to the quilt of American natural resources. One is not better, although there are certainly areas that don't have as many varied species as others. I am sure there are renowned scientist or professors from some University (probably one close to the Calumet Region) that claim the Region is THE MOST BIOLOGICALLY DIVERSE in the nation and they probably have published papers and alleged facts to that end. However, despite what we learned in school, I have concluded that much of science is tainted by what the investigator wants to believe or conclude. "Pure" science is rare, especially these days.

So I'll agree that the Region is a neat place biologically and I loved exploring Pincushion Bog and Cowles Bog and Mount Baldy and Mount Tom and the interdunal ponds and the Nipissing Dunes that can still be found hidden between industrial lands in Gary. But guess what, the Southern Indiana Hills with Pioneer Mothers grove, and Southern Illinios with Cypress swamps and LaRue Pine Hills and Oakwood Bottoms, and the Mississippi floodplain, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan with crystal clear spring fed ponds where you can see fish 40 feet down, and Taquamenon falls, and the Stonington jack pine flats, and Nothern Minnesota with more water and bogs and wetlands, and majestic white pine and the amazing BWCA with 1000 year old cedar....all those places are pretty darn special and may be as or even more biologically diverse.

And I'm willing to bet that people on this forum now living across America could say pretty much the same thing for areas they have lived and explored.

I hope I haven't offended anyone or hurt anyone's feelings, as that wasn't my intention. Just a biologist and forester and explorer of the outdoors giving his feelings.
Go to Top of Page

Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2010 :  08:01:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dave

... In between the factories and refineries, you can find little bits of prairie, lakes, woodlands, rivers, swamps, dunes, savannas, etc., etc. I think that is a big part of the charm of the region. ...


I've commented on other posts about the PRAIRIE, yes, an actual half-mile long WILD PRAIRIE that was right there in the middle of Hammond, south of the IHB railroad yard, north of 165th/Summer Blvd, and east of Indianapolis Blvd. -- at least through the '60s. My family lived close by, on Kenwood, and we would take our dogs rabbit hunting there. The prairie was so huge that at least once, one of the dogs appeared to be permanently lost. It took a few minutes of shouting before we finally heard her answering yelp far in the distance.

I remember cattails, horsetails, lots of sand and low brush ... and, of course, what were called "rabbit balls."

East-sider Shep talks a lot about places on the west side of town; yet I've never come across any mention of the prairie just one mile from his house, even though he must have passed it every day on his way to Hammond High.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2010 :  11:04:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



I don't know if anyone alrerady asked this or covered this topic but does anyone recall that chocolate-flavored water called Kayo? Where I grew up, we had a corner store called Smith's Royal Blue. It was located on the south east corner of Michigan and Columbia. It was torn down to make a right-turn lane. I loved that little mom-and-pop store! Well, aside from Kayo, I remember buying Vernor's ginger ale, Wanzer's Milk (Wanzer on milk is like stering on silver, sound familiar?), Kraml Milk and Bun candy bars. Bozo Circus gave Bun bars as part of the Grand Prize Game prizes.

On a somber note, I was in that corner store with my mom (I was four years old) when the radio which was playing music on the AM band announced JFK had been shot in Dallas. Camelot had died.

Dave G
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2010 :  21:27:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does anyone remember the A&P and Stienberg & Baum stores on Sohl close to the post office? I seem to remember Stienberg & Baum prevoiusly being located on State Street across from the Hammond Public Library.

I always wanted to eat at Cataldi's there on Sohl & State but it closed before I got the chance. Did anyone ever eat there?

Dave G
Go to Top of Page

duane

381 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2010 :  21:35:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow - Steinberg-baum....haven't heard that name in years.
And Kraml Milk....believe it or not, Kermit the Frog and Piano playing dog used to do Kraml milk commercials long before they became popular on Sesame Street. The commercials were quite violent, with Dog usually blowing Kermit up with a cannon. There are some clips on Youtube of these two advertising other products this same way, but I couldn't find any for Kraml milk.
Go to Top of Page

Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2010 :  21:56:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WOW, Steinberg-Baum had great prices. I remember two things I bought there. The first and best was my wife's original wedding and engagement rings and later an 8 1/2' fly rod. After 45 years of marriage I still have both.

Roger D.
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  16:02:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I was in 8th grade or maybe freshman year I remember when the old court house downtown was being torn down. I have a vivid image in my mind of the east wall (facing the dogleg curve on Hohman) being removed thus exposing the interior rooms, wall and floor sections as if a time capsule had been opened in public.

Here's a photo courtesy of the HPL I saved a few years ago. You can see the court house's shadow being cast on the south entrance of Goldblatt's.



Has anyone here ever been inside before it was razed?

Dave G
Go to Top of Page

Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  16:10:52  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Cool picture, Dave! Thanks for sharing that.

I can't remember ever being in the old courthouse.

Man, would I ever like to turn back the clock to the times when that picture was taken!

Tom
Go to Top of Page

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  16:12:36  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I was never in the building but I waited for buses in front of it. One day I was waiting for a bus to go visit my cousin in Munster and I was holding a dollar bill out in front of me between my thumb and index finger and one of the many pigeons that called the Court House home, pooped on George Washington.
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  16:19:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Tom J and Bob K,

I couldn't agree with you more Tom and Bob - that's hilarious!

I'm taking my kids to Junior Bible Quiz practice at our church in a few minutes so I probably won't post or reply for at least another 4 hours.

Thanks again,
Dave G
Go to Top of Page

Jay

148 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  17:54:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BobK

I was never in the building but I waited for buses in front of it. One day I was waiting for a bus to go visit my cousin in Munster and I was holding a dollar bill out in front of me between my thumb and index finger and one of the many pigeons that called the Court House home, pooped on George Washington.



Your post brought back an unpleasant memory for me. Back in the early 80's, I had picked up my new nylon school jacket at the local cleaners. I was so proud of it that I decided to wear it while I finished my errands.
I had some business out at Calumet College up in Whiting. So I drove north on Calumet Avenue, then turned east on 125th street, a street that runs right through Lake George. It was a bright sunny afternoon, so I had the driver window rolled down and my arm sticking out. Then I felt something hit my arm. An unseen bird had made a target of the left sleeve of my newly cleaned jacket.
You should have seen the surprise look I received when I returned the jacket to the cleaners within 30 minute of picking it up.
Go to Top of Page

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2010 :  18:16:24  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Probably a seagull, otherwise known as a flying rat.
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  11:37:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


I know some of you fellow Shep Talk posters may have celebrated a "few" more birthdays than have I, but I was a kid back in the 60's and I can still hear that TV commercial in my head "Bargain Town! Bargain Town! Bargain Town, USA!" I wish would have kept any of my toys from back then. I know that store became what we now call Toys 'R' Us. I think that's where my magnetic-vibrating NFL football game came from. It was fun watching the little plastic players end up doing a massive "square dance" in the middle of that metal field!

Did anyone here ever shop there?

Dave G
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  13:36:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just one more question before I close for today: does anyone remember the boxy-shaped Yellow Cab taxis made by Checker which had these cool little folding chairs in the rear? I also remember there was a Howard's cab which had red and white paint.
Go to Top of Page

Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  13:39:15  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by EastHammondBoomer

Just one more question before I close for today: does anyone remember the boxy-shaped Yellow Cab taxis made by Checker which had these cool little folding chairs in the rear? I also remember there was a Howard's cab which had red and white paint.



Sure do remember those taxis, even though I don't think I ever rode in one. There was also a "Checker" cab company, right?

Tom
Go to Top of Page

S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  14:00:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob and Jay,

Just so you won't feel too special, I'll tell you of my being targeted by a bird (in Nashville) that could have been one of Da Region's birds gone south or heading back north....
I was on the way to a final exam with no time to spare on my college campus when a bird
dropped one on my skirt. I had to go on to the exam and was so sure I smelled to high heavens the whole time.....


(Quote)
one of the many pigeons that called the Court House home, pooped on George Washington.
Go to Top of Page

Joel357

USA
120 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  14:21:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Both Howard's Cab and Hammond Yellow were customers of mine. They had Motorola Business Dispatchers(made specifically for the taxi industry)in the cars. Those Checker American cars were built like brick S*&t Houses and they would put 400,000 to 500,000 miles on them. They wanted to have a majority of their fleet Checker American because they wouldn't have to carry parts from different manufacturers in stock. Now, the cab companies buy mostly Ford Crown Vics from police departments. Those are old police cruisers.

Joel
Go to Top of Page

Joel357

USA
120 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  14:50:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom J,

Checker Cab was owned by Hammond Yellow and Checker Cab. Their motto was "A thinking fellow rides a Yellow".

Joel
Go to Top of Page

Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2010 :  15:37:41  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Joel357

Tom J,

Checker Cab was owned by Hammond Yellow and Checker Cab. Their motto was "A thinking fellow rides a Yellow".

Joel



Cool. Thanks, Joel.

Tom
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  05:37:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ever since joining this great forum (more like a gathering of friends reminiscing), I have wanted to throw out a question here and there about little things I recall from my childhood in Hammond and Da Region. I know there is a lot of knowledge from all of you and it's okay if my question draws no bites.

My memory is a little blurry but I recall the older Lafayette school building close to my home had this metal fire escape "duct" or tunnel which was on the outside of the building along one of the sides up on the top floor. I always tried to imagine what it must have felt like to slide down inside it.

I also sorta remember Wallace and Riverside school buildings before they were torn down and reconstructed. Did anyone's school building have one of those fire escape chutes?

Dave G
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  05:54:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


I'm not sure if I should have started a new thread subject line for this topic/question but I wanted to ask if anyone has memories of the Lake County Fair in Crown Point? I think we only went a few times but it had a lasting impression on me. The 4-H, cake and other foods contests, mechanical rides, etc.

I posted a picture of my family when I was seven years old. Our red Buick LeSabre station wagon would take us many places. I used to sit in the little fold-down rumble seat which made me face the traffic behind us. That car had what was called "power brakes". I later found out why they called them that when I tried driving it with my dad! We'd take Sunday drives down to Rensselaer or Winnimac or even Turkey Run State Park. Good times.

Dave G
Go to Top of Page

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  07:12:37  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Dave, I went to Wallace but I don't recall one of the tubes there. I do remember the one at Lafayette and others but I don't recall where.

My mother and I lived with my grandparents while my dad was off to war. The house was the first house south of Wallace School. There was the school set back from Calumet facing Jefferson St I think, although I always used the east entrance, and the old wooden gym to the south next to the alley. Across the alley was a long brick building that had housing in the back and a soda shop in the front. Then there was a vacant lot and then our house at 6234 Calumet Ave. My grandparents died a few years apart, my dad came back from the war and we moved to 444 Highland St when I was about 6 so I don't remember a whole lot from there. I do remember my dad had made a great swing set for me in the back yard and shortly before they tore the block down to build the new school I took my wife for a drive down the alley past the back yard to see if the swings were still there. They weren't and what seemed like such a large back yard in my memory was so small.

I remember Dana Drumstead lived a few doors to the south. She was an older girl that befriended me. I remember years later when I worked at Burger's that she and her mother came in to shop. At the corner of Kenwood there was an old gas station with an outside grease pit, which were later outlawed.

I can recall walking to the grocery store with my mother. The store was on the east side of Calumet and north of the rr tracks. It must have been across the street from the fire station. I remember standing there at the tracks waiting for the train to go by and getting cinders in my eyes from the steam engine. I remember when we were almost to the store I was walking with my hands in my pockets and tripped on a crack in the sidewalk and fell on my face. Mom was worried about my front teeth but they were OK but boy did that hurt.

I remember the candy store on Jefferson across the street from the school. It was on the front porch of a house if I remember correctly but this was when we lived on Highland St.

Wow! I did a little rambling there didn't I?
Go to Top of Page

Tom J

1192 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  08:27:46  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave:

I LOVE that family picture! It looks like you had a great little family. It's nice to have memories of a great childhood, isn't it?

I wish EVERY kid could grow up in a home like my childhood home, one with love, stability, and security. It looks like you did.

Tom

P.S.

I don't remember one of those tubes at Wallace, but they had one at Washington Jr. High when I was going to school there.

Edited by - Tom J on 01/12/2010 08:30:35
Go to Top of Page

tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  08:59:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave; At Irving they had portable wooden bldgss for 2nd grade, a newer 2 story brick for K thru sixth and an old 4 story for seven thru ninth. Although the fourth floor was not used because it was a gym and a stage and they built a new gym and auditorium that opened my first year in the old building, the fourth floor was condemed but we could still sneak up there. It had a fire door which opened to the roof and fire escape that was rusted so bad, it was just hanging loosely. One of my thrills was to go up there in the dark and explore. Since the floor was all wood, when I walked across it, it squeaked loudly in the ceilings of the classrooms of the whole third floor. So all the teachers called the principal, Mr Lockey. He came up with the janitor and I went out the fire door and dove down the condemed fire escape so the fire escape banged against the wall all the way down bringing all the classes to the windows to see what the racket was. I ran around the corner of the playground and across the street where my house was. Meanwhile Mr Lockey ran down the stairs and out the new gym door. He knew that I always hid in my garage and locked the door so he went to my back door and knocked for my mom. He had given up on trying to discipline me years ago so he would leave it up to my parents. My dad took care of the punishment. Tom W
Go to Top of Page

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  09:13:40  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Tom, Mr Lockey was principal when I was there. I liked him even though I got a few swats from him. I think Mrs Dunning was the english teacher? She gave the worst swats. Mrs Stiner was math teacher? She had my dad as a student when he went there. She always used a kleenix when opening a door. Mr Krueger was the mechanical drawing teacher. He transferred to HHS as a coach. I'm not sure what classes he taught.
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  09:46:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom W & Bob: thanks for posting some of your childhood memories about Irving. I don't know if you've already seen this but the school web site has a video showing the "old" building before it was demolished. I watched it but it's not what I thought it'd be: http://www.hammond.k12.in.us/irvinges/Irving%20past%20and%20present.htm

Dave G
Go to Top of Page

tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  10:04:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob Bernie Kruger started as wood shop teacher and he helped Mr Thompson as Asst. Coach. Mr Kruger COULD GIVE SWATS. He made his paddle with holes in it for killer aerodynamics. Miss Steiner had blue hair!! Ms Clark had the library and taught Latin. I liked her and took 2 years of Latin. She also had drama club. We did a play in Latin called "Rudra Kucola". In English, "Little Red Riding Hood." I remember lots more but the above stands out. Tom W
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  11:14:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This may not qualify for "Gone but not forgotten" but I used to like shopping at Montgomery Ward (Monkey Ward) in Munster. I guess it was a Sears caliber store. Even had a nice little diner toward the rear. I can still see that fake seal blowing a beach ball up in the air in the vacuum cleaner display. If I remember right, there were other stores, a candy shop and a restaurant in that plaza. Does anyone have any Montgomery Ward memories?

Why is the HAMMOND clinic located in MUSNTER?

Dave G

Go to Top of Page

BobK

431 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  11:32:48  Show Profile  Send BobK a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Hammond Clinic and Wards used to be located in downtown Hammond. Wards was located on the east side of Hohman just south of the bend. I went to Hammond Clinic when it was in Hammond but I can't remember what building it was in. I believe it was originally named Kuhn Clinic.
Go to Top of Page

MrRazz

USA
52 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  19:10:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Oh, the Lake County Fair...I remember going to it almost every year. The grounds were beautiful and at fair time it was so exciting and busy with all the exhibits, judging, and so many other activities. There was a grandstand by the lake...seems to me they had some kind of races there, but my memory fails me. Also, there was a beach for swimming on the lake. Actually, I think I fell "in love" once at the fair, but being so young then, I have done that several times since. Crown Point itself had a lot of character and history.

Unfortunately we never had a station wagon, but we had neighborhood friends whose families did. It was a treat to ride with them...we would always scramble to the back , fold the seat down into the floor, and had all that room to play in. Funny how Chrysler just figured out how to do that with their mini vans.

You mentioned Turkey Run State Park...one of my fondest memories as a kid was going to the Rockville Covered Bridge Festival in Parke County with my family during the peak of the fall colors. The bridges and the countryside were the most elaborate scenery I had ever seen. I took my wife and daughters there a few years ago. In fact, I found a winter photo recently on the web of the covered bridge at Turkey Run State Park that I have for the background on my desktop.

Thanks for bringing those memories back with your post and family photo.

Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  19:32:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
MrRazz (Tim),

I'm glad you also shared your fond memories of a place and time captured in one's heart and soul.

Dave G
quote:
Originally posted by MrRazz

Dave,

Oh, the Lake County Fair...I remember going to it almost every year. The grounds were beautiful and at fair time it was so exciting and busy with all the exhibits, judging, and so many other activities. There was a grandstand by the lake...seems to me they had some kind of races there, but my memory fails me. Also, there was a beach for swimming on the lake. Actually, I think I fell "in love" once at the fair, but being so young then, I have done that several times since. Crown Point itself had a lot of character and history.

Unfortunately we never had a station wagon, but we had neighborhood friends whose families did. It was a treat to ride with them...we would always scramble to the back , fold the seat down into the floor, and had all that room to play in. Funny how Chrysler just figured out how to do that with their mini vans.

You mentioned Turkey Run State Park...one of my fondest memories as a kid was going to the Rockville Covered Bridge Festival in Parke County with my family during the peak of the fall colors. The bridges and the countryside were the most elaborate scenery I had ever seen. I took my wife and daughters there a few years ago. In fact, I found a winter photo recently on the web of the covered bridge at Turkey Run State Park that I have for the background on my desktop.

Thanks for bringing those memories back with your post and family photo.



Go to Top of Page

S C Jones

USA
448 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  19:34:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mr. Clavin must be reading my mind. Just this morning I was lamenting the inability to go directly to a posting and VOILA! this evening the arrows appeared and I clicked on one.

THANK YOU for that new addition to our site!



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!
Go to Top of Page

HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2010 :  20:28:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll try to tie as many of these topics together as possible.

The only time I was ever in the old Hammond Courthouse was to apply for a summer job; it was a set-up....my dad, who was a very A-political guy, nevertheless called a few Hammond bigwigs to see if they would give me a local or county job. It was a miserably hot day in early June of 1971, and I remember wearing this ridiculous pair of striped blue bell-bottoms, which my dad thought made me look presentable. The guy I had to see for the interview was a typical cigar-chomping, polyester-wearing, backroom-dealing Hammond pol whose name I'll withold. But I got the job---as a ground crew laborer at the Lake County Fairgrounds.

It was a fun summer, and the other guys and I easily spent as much time screwing around as we did working. We were always climbing over the chain-link fence down at the sound end of the grounds to run over to the convenience store, competing with each other for the attention of the babes who served as summer counselors for the kid's programs, and emptying big, raunchy 55-gallon garbage cans that had been baking in the summer heat. Our boss was this old guy name Stan Drozyzinksi who had a dalmation dog named Mitzi; so I guess that made her Mitzi Drozyzinski.

I remember sticking a glob of wood putty into the tail-pipe of the car owned by one of our fellow workers who was really a jerk; can't remember how that one ended when he started the car to go home.
--------------
RE: big metal tube-like things on buildings: the one I remember most was this huge MAIL CHUTE that ran down the side of the embankment at the East Chicago South Shore station off Indy Blvd; it extended from the top of the elevated platform down to the parking lot. When my dad was working his daytime Chicago radio show in the '50's, my mother would take Mike and me to pick him up around 5pm; Mike always told me to watch the bottom end of the chute, since he thought our dad would slide down it instead of using the stairs.

Larry r

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 01/12/2010 22:33:42
Go to Top of Page

Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  09:06:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave G. To answer your question as to why the Hammond Clinic is in Munster. If I remember correctly it is because the Whiting Clinic is or was in Hammond (169th. st. in Woodmar). HE He

Roger D
Go to Top of Page

EastHammondBoomer

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  11:43:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What's the name of the imitation brick sheets or shingles which most always peeled at the corners and seams? The house next to ours had this as siding. Our house had those brittle shingles (asbestos?) which were tucked under the row above. Here are a couple of photos for reference:





Also, I found this photo of the phone directories from the 60's. I wish I would have kept our old phone books. Anyone remember these?


Dave G
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 5 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Shep Talk Forum - sheptalk.flicklives.com © 2006-2014 Jim Clavin v3.4.07 Go To Top Of Page
Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.07